The Red Trailer Mystery

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Random House, 2003 - Juvenile Fiction - 262 pages
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ABOUT THE SERIES: Trixie Belden lives on Crabapple Farm just outside Sleepyside, New York. With her best friend Honey Wheeler, they hope to one day start the Belden-Wheeler Detective Agency - but in the meantime, they get lots of practice solving all the exciting mysteries that take place around Sleepysidea Still popular after over fifty years, this is the return of Trixie Belden in the original books that started it all! ABOUT THIS TITLE: Trixie and Honey's friend Jim has run away from Sleepyside - before anyone could tell him that he is the only heir to the huge Frayne fortune. The girls set out across upstate New York in a trailer to track him down ... and stumble onto another mystery on the way!

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Contents

A Search Begins
5
Sobs in the Night
26
A Rescue
34
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Julie Campbell was born on June 1, 1908 in Flushing, NY. At the age of eight, she won her first short story contest. After high school, she worked as the assistant society editor of the New York Evening Post. Eventually she was the head of her own literary agency. Under her maiden name, Julie Campbell, she wrote the first six boooks in the Trixie Belden series and all the titles in the Ginny Gordon series. Under her married name, Julie Tatham, she wrote some of the titles in the Cherry Ames and Vicki Barr series. Campbell died on July 7, 1999.

Beverly Cleary was born in McMinnville, Oregon, and, until she was old enough to attend school, lived on a farm in Yamhill, a town so small it had no library. Her mother arranged with the State Library to have books sent to Yamhill and acted as librarian in a lodge room upstairs over a bank. There Mrs. Cleary learned to love books. When the family moved to Portland, where Mrs. Cleary attended grammar school and high school, she soon found herself in the low reading circle, an experience that has given her sympathy for the problems of struggling readers. By the third grade she had conquered reading and spent much of her childhood either with books or on her way to and from the public library. Before long her school librarian was suggesting that she should write for boys and girls when she grew up. The idea appealed to her, and she decided that someday she would write the books she longed to read but was unable to find on the library shelves, funny stories about her neighborhood and the sort of children she knew.

After graduation from junior college in Ontario, California, and the University of California at Berkeley, Mrs. Cleary entered the School of Librarianship at the University of Washington, Seattle. There she specialized in library work with children. She was Children's Librarian in Yakima, Washington, until she married Clarence Cleary and moved to California. The Clearys are the parents of twins, now grown. Mrs. Cleary's hobbies are travel and needlework.

Mrs. Cleary's books have earned her many prestigious awards, including the 1984 John Newbery Medal for Dear Mr. Henshaw, for the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children in 1983. Her Ramona and Her Father and Ramona Quimby, Age 8 were named 1978 and 1982 Newbery Honor Books, respectively. Among Mrs. Cleary's other awards are the American Library Association's 1975 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, the Catholic Library Association's 1980 Regina Medal, and the University of Southern Mississippi's 1982 Silver Medallion, all presented in recognition of her lasting contribution to children's literature. In addition, Mrs. Cleary was the 1984 United States author nominee for the Hans Christian Andersen Award, a prestigious international award. Equally important are the more than 35 statewide awards Mrs. Cleary's books have received based on the direct votes of her young readers. The Beverly Cleary Sculpture Garden for Children, featuring bronze statues of Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, and Ribsy, was recently opened in Portland, Oregon.

This witty and warm author is truly an international favorite. Mrs. Cleary's books appear in over twenty countries in fourteen languages and her characters, including Henry Huggins, Ellen Tebbits, Otis Spoffordm, and Beezus and Ramona Quimby, as well as Ribsy, Socks, and Ralph S. Mouse, have delighted children for generations. There have been Japanese, Spanish, and Swedish television programs based on the Henry Huggins series. PBS-TV aired a ten-part series based on the Ramona stories. One-hour adaptations of the three Ralph S. Mouse books have been shown on ABC-TV. All of Mrs. Cleary's adaptations still can be seen on cable television, and the Ramona adaptations are available in video stores.

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