The Relationship of Emotional Intelligence and Transformational Leadership Behavior in Non-profit Executive Leaders

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ProQuest, 2008 - 191 pages
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What characterizes an effective leader? Are there qualities of effective leaders that could be used in developmental processes for new emerging leaders? This study seeks to address these questions by examining the relationship between emotional intelligence and leadership styles among executives leading in non-profit, faith-based organizations based in Colorado. A general questionnaire gathered demographic data related to the perceived importance of basic quality of life and leadership qualities. The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ Form 5X) developed by Avolio and Bass examined the leader's self-reported leadership style. Transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership styles were compared with scores on the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory Test (EQ-i). Statistical cluster analysis demonstrated a strong relationship between transformational leadership behaviors and emotional intelligence. In addition, linear regression analysis revealed that five components of emotional intelligence accounted for over half of the variation in transformational leadership behavior. The five were: optimism, self-actualization, empathy, problem solving, and assertiveness. All but empathy scored higher than the general population. The study findings suggest that developing these five areas in executive leaders could increase the likelihood of the use of transformational leadership behaviors. Transformational leadership has been studied extensively and been shown to positively affect organizations. Further study would be needed to demonstrate the breadth of possible application, but it is worthy of consideration that a focus on developing emotional intelligence could result in increased transformational leadership behaviors, positively influencing an organization.
 

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Contents

LITERATURE REVIEW
15
METHODOLOGY
65
DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS
80
Position by Gender
81
Years in Position with Organization with NonProfits
82
Descriptive Statistics EI and Components
84
Descriptive Statistics MLQ and Components
86
Time for Presidents and CEOs in Organization and Position
87
MLQ Scores of Senior VPs and VPs Descriptive Data
98
Comparison of MLQ Scores by PresidentsCEOs and Senior VPsVPs
99
Average EQi scores by Transformational Leadership Cluster
101
EQi Versus Transformational Leadership
103
Correlation Coefficients
105
Life Issues Responses
106
Rescoring of life assessment issues negative questions
107
Life Issues Responses rescored
108

Average Age of Presidents and CEOs by Gender
88
EQi Scores of Presidents and CEOs
89
Comparison of PresidentsCEOs EQi scores with the Study Population
90
MLQ Scores of Presidents and CEOs
92
Education of Senior VPs and VPs
93
Average Age of Senior VPs and VPs by Gender
94
EQ Descriptive Statistics for Senior VPs and VPs
95
Comparison of EQ Scores of PresidentsCEOs and Senior VPsVPs
97
Life Issues by PresidentCEOs NonPresidents and Total
109
Total Life Issue Scores
110
Comparison of NonProfit Executives and Construction Executives on EI
113
Comparison of Means of Nonprofit and Construction Executives
115
RESULTS CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
117
REFERENCES
145
APPENDICES
161
Copyright

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