The Remote Country of Women

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University of Hawaii Press, 1994 - Fiction - 376 pages
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Bai Hua shifts from tragicomic farce to earthy eroticism to modernist playwriting in this carefully wrought exploration of the clash between two ways of life. In alternating chapters, the novel tells the stories of Sunamei, a winsome young woman from an idyllic matriarchal community, and Liang Rui, a self-absorbed man who is also weary witness to the Cultural Revolution. Through his two protagonists, Bai Hua addresses themes of the repression and freedom of sexuality, the brutality of modernity, and the fluidity of gender roles as the novel moves hypnotically and inevitably toward a collision between two worlds. First published in mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong in 1988, The Remote Country of Women has since been translated into French, German, and Russian. It appears now in English for the first time.
 

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THE REMOTE COUNTRY OF WOMEN

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Two people's vastly different experiences during the Cultural Revolution are the subject of this beautiful, sad novel by an internationally renowned Chinese writer and dissident not previously ... Read full review

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Contents

I
1
II
11
III
27
IV
35
V
49
VI
82
VII
93
VIII
119
XIV
218
XV
229
XVI
251
XVII
263
XVIII
281
XIX
289
XX
302
XXI
326

IX
127
X
148
XI
154
XII
186
XIII
194
XXII
337
XXIII
345
XXIV
359
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