The Report of the Select Committee on Emigration in 1826

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J. Murray, 1827 - Great Britain - 177 pages
 

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Page 3 - House, examined the matters to them referred; and have agreed to the following REPORT...
Page 10 - It must not be forgotten, in a comprehensive view of such a system, that the pauper, for whose labour no remuneration can be afforded at home, will be transmuted by this process into an independent proprietor, and at no distant period will become a consumer of the manufactured articles of his native country. Nor, on the other hand, can any calculable period be assigned for the termination of such a system, until all the colonies of the British empire are saturated, and millions added to those who...
Page 1 - notes and observations" of a magistrate of the county of Middlesex, upon the minutes of evidence taken before a select committee appointed by the House of Commons, to inquire into the state of the police of the metropolis.
Page 8 - It is equally considered as certain, that parishes will anxiously accept this facility (as far as their own concurrence is required,) of relieving themselves, at a slight annual expense, of any present and pressing redundancy of population, and also of securing for the future the effectual prevention supplied by this measure for any accumulation of labourers whose services they may be incapable of remunerating. " It is at once evident that this system of emigration could be made immediately applicable...
Page 144 - I am here living in the very midst of them, from 20 to 30 pass my door almost every day; I visit the camp every week, and at all times I take an opportunity of conversing with them on their affairs. I have always found them satisfied and happy. Some of them have told me with tears in their eyes that they never knew what happiness was until now.
Page 178 - A surplus population is encouraged ; men who receive but a small pittance know that they have only to marry, and that pittance will be augmented in proportion to the number of their children.
Page 176 - It is a frightful state of society, and when it is considered, it fills one with so much pain and horror, that I have frequently prayed to God, if it were his will, rather to take me out of life than leave me to witness such evils, if they were to continue ; they are beyond the endurance of human nature.
Page 4 - employment. That the effect of this redundancy " is not only to reduce a part of this population " to a great degree of destitution and misery, but " also to deteriorate the general condition of the " labouring classes. That by its producing a " supply of labour in excess, as compared with " the demand, the wages of labour are necessa...
Page 177 - ... to him, whether he earns a small sum or a large one. It is obvious, indeed, that a disinclination to work must be the consequence of so vicious a system. He, whose subsistence is secure without work, and who cannot obtain more than a mere sufficiency by the hardest work, will naturally be an idle and careless labourer. Frequently the work done by four or five such labourers, does not amount to what might easily be performed by a single labourer working at task-work.
Page 4 - ... redundancy is not only to reduce a part of this population to a great degree of destitution and misery, but also to deteriorate the general condition of the labouring classes :—that by its producing a supply of labour in excess as compared with the demand, the wages of labour are necessarily reduced to a minimum, which...

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