The Resolution of Conflict: Constructive and Destructive Processes

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Yale University Press, 1977 - Psychology - 420 pages
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The basic question to which this book is addressed is not how to eliminate or prevent conflict but rather how to make it productive, or minimally, how to prevent it from being destructive. I shall not deal with situations of "pure" conflict in which inevitably one side loses what the other gains. My interest is in conflict where there is a mixture of cooperative and competitive interests, where a variety of outcomes is possible; mutual loss, gain for one and loss of the other, and mutual gain. Thus my query can be restated, as an investigation of the conditions under which the participants will evolve a cooperative relationship or a competitive relationship in a situation which permits either. -- from the introduction.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Cooperative and Competitive Processes
20
Intrapsychic Conflict
33
Group Formation
48
Intergroup Conflict
67
Threats Promises and Influence
124
Trust and Suspicion Theoretical Notes
143
Research Papers
177
The Effects of Threat and Communication upon Inter personal Bargaining Initial Studies
215
Further Studies of the Effects of Threat
249
Structural and Attitudinal Factors in Bargaining
282
Strategies of Inducing Cooperation Experimental Studies
314
Concluding Essay
349
Factors Influencing the Resolution of Conflict
351
Bibliography
401
Index
413

Experimental Studies of Trust and Suspicion
179

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About the author (1977)

Morton Deutsch was born in the Bronx, New York on February 4, 1920. He received a bachelor of science degree from City College in 1939 and a master's degree from the University of Pennsylvania. He enlisted in the Army Air Forces during World War II and flew 30 missions as a navigator over Nazi-occupied Europe. He received a doctorate from M.I.T. He was a leading expert on conflict resolution and mediation. He wrote or co-wrote several books including Preventing World War III and The Resolution of Conflict. In 2006, he, Peter T. Coleman, and Eric C. Marcus edited The Handbook of Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice. He served on the faculty at Teachers College of Columbia University from 1963 until he became professor emeritus in 1990. He died on March 13, 2017 at the age of 97.

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