The Return of the Unicorns: The Natural History and Conservation of the Greater One-Horned Rhinoceros

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Columbia University Press, Jun 25, 2003 - Nature - 384 pages
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Since 1984, Eric Dinerstein has led the team directly responsible for the recovery of the greater one-horned rhinoceros in the Royal Chitwan National Park in Nepal, where the population had once declined to as few as 100 rhinos. The Return of the Unicorns is an account of what it takes to save endangered large mammals. Dinerstein outlines the multifaceted recovery program—structured around targeted fieldwork and scientific research, effective protective measures, habitat planning and management, public-awareness campaigns, economic incentives to promote local guardianship, and bold, uncompromising leadership—that brought these extraordinary animals back from the brink of extinction. In an age when scientists must also become politicians, educators, fund-raisers, and activists in order to safeguard the subjects they study, Dinerstein's inspiring story offers a successful model for large-mammal conservation applicable throughout Asia and across the globe.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
Vanishing Mammals Vanishing Landscapes
7
CULTURE CONSERVATION AND THE DEMAND
27
PART II
59
MALE DOMINANCE REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS
134
PART III
179
THE RECOVERY OF RHINOCEROS AND OTHER LARGE
226
APPENDIX A METHODS
255
MEASUREMENTS AND OTHER PHYSICAL FEATURES
271
A PROFILE OF RHINOCEROS BEHAVIOR
283
REFERENCES
291
INDEX
303
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Page 9 - We must face the fact that the Cenozoic, the Age of Mammals, which has been in retreat since the late Pleistocene, is over, and that the "Anthropozoic" or "Catastrophozoic

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About the author (2003)

Eric Dinerstein is chief scientist and vice president for science at the World Wildlife Fund in Washington, D.C. In addition to being active in large-mammal conservation in Asia for twenty-six years, he is the co-author of the Global 200 Ecoregions, an effort to establish global priorities for biodiversity conservation.


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