The Rise and Fall of the Femme Fatale in British Literature, 1790-1910

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2012 - History - 163 pages
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The Rise and Fall of the Femme Fatale in British Literature, 1790–1910 explores the femme fatale's career in nineteenth-century British literature. It traces her evolution—and devolution—formally, historically, and ideologically through a selection of plays, poems, novels, and personal correspondence. Considering well-known fatal women alongside more obscure ones, The Rise and Fall of the Femme Fatale sheds new light on emerging notions of gender, sexuality, and power throughout the long nineteenth century. By placing the fatal woman in a still developing literary and cultural narrative, this study examines how the femme fatale adapts over time, reflecting popular tastes and socio-economic landscapes.

 

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Contents

Literary Form and the NineteenthCentury Femme Fatale
1
1 Gothic Ballads and the Supernatural Femme Fatale
17
2 The Realist Novel and the Romanticized Femme Fatale
49
The Erotic Femme Fatale
81
4 Decadence SelfAwareness and the Decline of the Femme Fatale
109
Reprising the Femme Fatale
139
Bibliography
145
Index
157
About the Author
163
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About the author (2012)

Heather L. Braun is an assistant professor of English at Macon State College in Georgia. She received her Ph.D. in English from Boston College, her M.A. from Claremont University, and her B.A. from Lafayette College.

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