The Robbins Process for Preserving Wood and Lumber from Mould, Decay and Destruction by Worms

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National Patent Wood Preserving Company, 1868 - Wood - 101 pages
 

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Page 60 - and I do hereby declare that the following is a full, clear and exact description thereof, which will enable those skilled in the art to make and use the same,
Page 23 - historical period," they are known to have been covered with luxuriant woods, verdant pastures, and fertile meadows, they are now too far deteriorated to be reclaimable by man ; nor can they become again fitted for human use except through great geological
Page 22 - replies : I cannot enough detest this thing, and I call it not an error, but a, curse and a calamity to all France ; for when the forests shall be cut, all arts shall cease, and they who practice them shall be driven out to eat grass with Nebuchadnezzar and the beasts of the field. I have divers times thought to set down
Page 22 - Having expressed his indignation at the folly of men in destroying the woods, his interlocutor defends the policy of felling them by citing the example of divers bishops, cardinals, priors, abbots, monkeries and chapters, which by cutting their woods have made three
Page 24 - rough timber, nor derived important collateral advantages of any sort from the destruction of her forests. She is consequently impoverished and crippled to the extent of the difference between what she actually possesses of wooded surface, and what she ought to have retained.
Page 22 - ground, and the good portion they received of the grain grown by the peasants upon it." To this argument Pallissy replies : I cannot enough detest this thing, and I call it not an error, but a, curse and
Page 25 - the proper proportion of woodland to entire surface of twenty-three per cent, for the interior of Germany, and supposes that near the coast, where the air is supplied with humidity by evaporation from the sea, it might safely be reduced to twenty per cent.
Page 23 - forests shall be cut, all arts shall cease, and they who practice them shall be driven out to eat grass with Nebuchadnezzar and the beasts of the field. I have divers times thought to set down
Page 30 - The naphthas, by this process, would be lost. The distillation must have been carried very far, as there was obtained a reddish pitch, very clammy, and much fatter than other pitch. This was the anthracene, chrysene, and pyrene of later times. The remainder was
Page 23 - and Dunoyer agree that the preservation of the forests in France is practicable only by their transfer to the state, which alone can protect them and secure their proper treatment. It is much to be feared that even this measure would be inadequate to

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