The Sanctity of Life and the Criminal Law: The Legacy of Glanville Williams

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Dennis J. Baker, Jeremy Horder
Cambridge University Press, Feb 14, 2013 - Law - 357 pages
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Described by The New York Times as 'Britain's foremost scholar of criminal law', Professor Glanville Williams was one of the greatest academic lawyers of the twentieth century. To mark the centenary of his birth in 2011, leading criminal law theorists and medical law ethicists from around the world were invited to contribute essays discussing the sanctity of life and criminal law while engaging with Williams' many contributions to these fields. In re-examining his work, the contributors have produced a provocative set of original essays that make a significant contribution to the current debate in these areas.
 

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Contents

Glanvilles inspiration
26
Preventive orders and the rule of law
45
The specialness of the general part of the criminal law
69
Sir Michael Foster Professor Williams and complicity
99
Intention revisited
148
A disintegrated theory of culpability
178
Williams
204
a classic
247
The failure of the defence of necessity as a mechanism
274
The duty to preserve life and its limits in English
296
Professing criminal law
328
Index
345
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About the author (2013)

Dennis Baker is a lecturer in law at King's College London.

Jeremy Horder is Edmund-Davies Professor of Criminal Law at King's College London.

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