The Satires

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1999 - Health & Fitness - 250 pages
Juvenal, writing between AD 110 and 130, was one of the greatest satirists of Imperial Rome. His powerful and witty attacks on the vices, abuses, and follies of the big city have been admired and used by many English writers, including Ben Jonson, Dryden, and most notably, Dr Johnson, who described his writing as `a mixture of gaiety and statelines, of pointed sentences and declamatory grandeur'. Juvenal has been seen as a stern moralist and, more recently, as an extravagant wit, and is acclaimed for his vivid description of the scenes which aroused his anger. He coined the famous phrase designating people `eager and anxious for two things; bread and races' (panem et circenses'). Niall Rudd's translation reproduces the original style and metrical effect of Juvenal's hexameters. William Barr's Introduction and Notes provide literary and historical background to the sixteen satires.
 

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Contents

Why Write Satire?
3
Hypocritical Perverts
9
The Evils of the Big City
15
The Emperors Fish
25
S A Tyrannical Host
31
Roman Wives
37
The Plight of Intellectuals
61
True Nobility
70
The Futility of Aspirations
86
A Simple Lifestyle
99
Welcome to a Survivor
107
The Influence of Vicious Parents
120
IS A Case of Cannibalism
131
The Advantages of Army Life
137
Index of Names
235
Copyright

The Woes of a Gigolo
80

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About the author (1999)

Niall Rudd is at University of Bristol. William Barr is at University of Liverpool.

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