The Science of ADHD: A Guide for Parents and Professionals

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John Wiley & Sons, Jul 28, 2010 - Family & Relationships - 336 pages
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The Science of ADHD addresses the scientific status of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in an informed and accessible way, without recourse to emotional or biased viewpoints. The author utilises the very latest studies to present a reasoned account of ADHD and its treatment.
  • Provides an up-to-date account of the neuroscience of ADHD, and the limitations of such research
  • Addresses the scientific status of ADHD from an objective and evidence-based standpoint without recourse to emotional and uninformed argument
  • Describes and discusses the ever increasing scientific evidence
  • As a parent of a child with ADHD, the author has first-hand experience of the subject matter, and a unique understanding of the information parents require on the subject
 

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Contents

Guide for Parents and Professionals 1 What is ADHD?
1
Guide for Parents and Professionals 2 Diagnosis Epidemiology and Comorbidity
32
Guide for Parents and Professionals 3 Causality and the Environmental Hypotheses of ADHD
68
Guide for Parents and Professionals 4 Psychological Theories of ADHD
86
Guide for Parents and Professionals 5 The Genetics of ADHD
113
Guide for Parents and Professionals 6 The Neuroscience of ADHD
130
Guide for Parents and Professionals 7 Psychostimulant Treatment of ADHD
146
Guide for Parents and Professionals 8 NonStimulant Medications and NonPharmacological Treatments
181
Guide for Parents and Professionals 9 Addiction Reward and ADHD
193
Guide for Parents and Professionals 10 The Past Present and Future Science of ADHD
216
Guide for Parents and Professionals Glossary
225
Guide for Parents and Professionals References
240
Guide for Parents and Professionals Index
327
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About the author (2010)

Chris Chandler is Principal Lecturer in Psychobiology at London Metropolitan University. Chandler’s research interests have previously centred on the role of dopamine in behaviour. He is currently involved in projects researching the addiction and changes that can occur in information processing. He teaches on the biological aspects of behaviour, including ADHD and addiction.

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