The Science of Debugging

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Coriolis, 2001 - Computers - 495 pages
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The only two eternals of software development are writing the code - and then debugging it. Effective debugging involves far more than walking through code with a debugger. This book recognizes that and sets out to make debugging less baffling, faster, and more effective by providing readers with the knowledge, tips, and techniques needed to rapidly identify, track down, and repair bugs. It goes further by offering practical tips on minimizing bugs and making them easier to find when they do occur. It includes chapters on testing and maintenance as they relate to debugging. Each chapter concludes with a "bug problem" and answers to these problems are provided in the last chapter. Above all, this is a book written by developers who've spent years tracking down bugs and offers practical, hands-on advice to make that task more predictable.

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About the author (2001)

Matthew Telles is a 20-year veteran of the software-development wars. In his time, he has seen FORTRAN, COBOL, and other dinosaur languages come and go. Currently a senior software engineer for Research Systems, Inc., his days are spent finding and fixing bugs that other people have created. Besides trying to be tactful, he also enjoys working with other developers to teach the techniques he has mastered over his career. With expertise in programming, designing, documenting, and debugging applications, he has reached the pinnacle of a programmer's existence: the ability to write his own bio blurbs for books. He is the author of seven other programming books.

Hsieh has developed applications using languages such as C, C++, Perl, Java. He is currently Director of Software Development with InfoNow Corporation.

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