The Science of chiropractic

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Palmer School of Chiropractic, 1906 - 413 pages
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From the mind of a genius humanitarian to ours. What an honor! Can't wait to read every word.
-Roger Barnick, DC

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Page 44 - DEAR SHE, My wife has returned from your hospital cured. Provided males are allowed at your bungalow, I would like to do you the honor of presenting myself there this afternoon. But I will not try to repay you; vengeance belongeth unto God. Yours noticeably, NO.
Page 40 - Stand close to all, but lean on none, And if the crowd desert you, Stand just as fearlessly alone, As if a throng begirt you; And learn what long the wise have known, Self-flight alone can hurt you.
Page 44 - AND FAIR MADAM, I have much pleasure to inform you that my dearly unfortunate wife will be no longer under your kind treatment, she having left this world for the other on the night of the 27th ultimo. For your help in this matter, I shall ever remain grateful. Yours reverently, Aim of Education.
Page 18 - He that uses many words for the explaining of any subject doth, like the cuttle fish, hide himself for the most part in his own ink...
Page 104 - ... current of arterial blood, which by Nature was intended to supply and nourish all nerves, ligaments, muscles, skin, bones and the artery itself. The rule of the artery must be absolute, universal and unobstructed or disease will be the result. I proclaimed then and there that all nerves...
Page 104 - I proclaimed that a disturbed artery marked the beginning to an hour and a minute when disease began to sow its seeds of destruction in the human body. That in no case could it be done without a broken or suspended current of arterial blood, which by Nature was intended to supply and nourish all nerves, ligaments, muscles, skin, bones and the artery itself.
Page 76 - One of the most remarkable circumstances connected with injuries of the spine is, the disproportion that exists between the apparently trifling accident that the patient has sustained, and the real and serious mischief that has in reality occurred, and which will eventually lead to the gravest consequences.
Page 224 - ... and never rest day or night until he knows the spine is true and in line from atlas to sacrum, with all the ribs in perfect union with the processes of the spine.
Page 32 - A Partnership.—" I called at Dr. Physic's office one day," relates a gentleman, " and found one of the most noted sextonundertakers lying on a settee, waiting for the return of the doctor. The easy familiarity of his position, and the perfect at-homeativeness, led me to say: ' Why, Mr. Plume, have you gone into partnership with the doctor?
Page 163 - Diagnosis is the art or act of recognizing the presence of disease from its...

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