The Scientists: A Family Romance

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Macmillan, Sep 18, 2012 - Biography & Autobiography - 196 pages
1 Review

A frank, intelligent, and deeply moving debut memoir

With the precociousness expected of the only child of a doctor and a classical musician—from the time he could get his toddler tongue to a pronounce a word like "De-oxy ribonucleic acid," or recite a French poem—Marco Roth was able to share his parents' New York, a world centered around house concerts, a private library of literary classics, and dinner discussions of the latest advances in medicine. That world ended when his father started to suffer the worst effects of the AIDS virus that had infected him in the early 1980s.

What this family could not talk about for years came to dominate the lives of its surviving members, often in unexpected ways. The Scientists is a story of how we first learn from our parents and how we then learn to see them as separate individuals; it's a story of how precociousness can slow us down when it comes to knowing about our desires and other people's. A memoir of parents and children in the tradition of Edmund Gosse, Henry Adams, and J.R. Ackerley, The Scientists grapples with a troubled intellectual and emotional inheritance, in a style that is both elegiac and defiant.

 

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The Scientists: A Family Romance

User Review  - Staff - Book Verdict

This book examines the weight of the tremendous secrets kept by one rarefied family, uncovered as Roth slowly processes, with the aid of great literature, his father's death. (Memoir Short Takes, 10/29/12) Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
15
Section 3
27
Section 4
43
Section 5
53
Section 6
67
Section 7
79
Section 8
93
Section 9
111
Section 10
117
Section 11
123
Section 12
153
Section 13
169
Section 14
187
Section 15
197
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About the author (2012)

Marco Roth was raised amid the vanished liberal culture of Manhattan's Upper West Side. After studying comparative literature at Columbia and Yale, he helped found the magazine n+1, in 2004. Recipient of the 2011 Shattuck prize for literary criticism, he lives in Philadelphia. The Scientists is his first book.

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