The Score, the Orchestra, and the Conductor

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Oxford University Press, Aug 26, 2009 - Music - 512 pages
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Known internationally for his work as a teacher of conducting, Gustav Meier's influence in the field cannot be overstated. In The Score, the Orchestra and the Conductor, Meier demystifies the conductor's craft with explanations and illustrations of what the conductor must know to attain podium success. He provides useful information from the rudimentary to the sophisticated, and offers specific and readily applicable advice for technical and musical matters essential to the conductor's first rehearsal with the orchestra. This book details many topics that otherwise are unavailable to the aspiring and established conductor, including the use of the common denominator, the "The ZIG-ZAG method", a multiple, cross-indexed glossary of orchestral instruments in four languages, an illustrated description of string harmonics, and a comprehensive listing of voice categories, their overlaps, dynamic ranges and repertory. The Score, the Orchestra and the Conductor is an indispensable addition to the library of every conductor and conducting student.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
CHAPTER 1The Beat
5
CHAPTER 2 Reading the Score
97
CHAPTER 3 Preparation of the Score for Conducting
131
Symbols for a Cuing System
151
CHAPTER 5 Sorting the Orchestration
223
CHAPTER 6 The Zigzag Way
243
CHAPTER 7 Special Techniques
299
CHAPTER 8 Additional Concerns
341
APPENDICES
357
Acknowledgments
477
Index of Musical Examples
481
General Index
485
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Gustav Meier is the director of the Orchestra Conducting Program at the Peabody Institute and Music Director of the Greater Bridgeport Symphony Orchestra in Connecticut. He has served on the faculties of Yale University, the Eastman School of Music, the University of Michigan and the Tanglewood Music Center. He makes regular appearances as guest conductor and teacher of conducting master classes in Europe, South and Central America, China, Canada, and throughout the United States.

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