The Screech Owls' Home Loss

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McClelland & Stewart, 1998 - Juvenile Fiction - 112 pages
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When a phone call from Nish gets Travis out of bed one bright winter’s morning, it looks as if it’s going to be the best weekend ever.

The Screech Owls’ home town lies beneath a thick fall of snow, topped with a layer of hard, smooth, beautiful ice. The whole world has become one gigantic skating rink. If only there were a way, thinks Travis, for these two wonderful days to last forever.

But before the weekend is over, Travis wishes it had never begun. One of the Screech Owls lies in a hospital bed, unable to move – the victim of a cowardly drunk driver who has fled the scene of the crime.

Now the Screech Owls must face a challenge that would make the toughest hockey game seem easy. Somewhere in the town of Tamarack a criminal is in hiding, and somehow – for the sake of their teammate – Travis and the Screech Owls must find a way to pull together and bring the culprit to justice.

The Screech OwlsHome Loss is the eigth book in the Screech Owls Series.

Check out the Screech Owls’ website at www.screechowls.com

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About the author (1998)

Roy MacGregor has been involved in hockey all his life. Growing up in Huntsville, Ontario, he competed for several years against a kid named Bobby Orr, who was playing in nearby Parry Sound. He later returned to the game when he and his family settled in Ottawa, where he worked for the Ottawa Citizen and became the Southam National Sports Columnist. He still plays old-timers hockey and has been a minor-hockey coach for more than a decade.

Roy MacGregor is the author of several classics in the literature of hockey. Home Game (written with Ken Dryden) and The Home Team were both number one national bestsellers. He has also written the game’s best-known novel, The Last Season. His other books include Road Games, The Seven A.M. Practice, and A Life in the Bush, a memoir of his father. He has also written books about native leaders and the Ottawa Valley.

Roy MacGregor is now a senior columnist for the National Post. He and his wife, Ellen, live in Kanata, Ontario. They have four children, Kerry, Christine, Jocelyn, and Gordon.

You can talk to Roy MacGregor at www.screechowls.com


From the Hardcover edition.

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