The Security & Freedom Through Encryption (Safe) Act: Congressional Hearing

Front Cover
DIANE Publishing, 2000 - Computers - 89 pages
Witnesses: Thomas Arnold, V.P. & Chief Tech. Officer, Cybersource Corp.; David Dawson, Chairman & CEO, V-One Corp.; Ed Gillespie, Exec. Dir., Amer. for Computer Privacy; Paddy Holahan, Exec. V.P., Marketing, Baltimore Technologies, International Finance Services Centre; Richard Hornstein, General Counsel, Network Assoc., Inc.; Ronald Lee, Assoc. Deputy Attorney Gen., U.S. Dept. of Justice; Barbara McNamara, Deputy Dir., National Security Agency; William Reinsch, Under Secretary of Commerce for Export Admin., U.S. Dept. of Commerce; & E. Eugene Schultz, Trusted Security Advisor, Global Integrity Corp.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
1
II
11
III
17
IV
21
V
27
VI
31
VII
41
VIII
47
IX
54
X
58
XI
88
XII
89
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 41 - Mr. Chairman and members of the committee, thank you very much for the opportunity to...
Page 88 - If cryptography can protect the trade secrets and proprietary information of businesses and thereby reduce economic espionage (which it can), it also supports in a most important manner the job of law enforcement. If cryptography can help protect nationally critical information systems and networks against unauthorized penetration (which it can), it also supports the national security of the United States.
Page 28 - Historically, this review process has provided us with valuable insight into what is being exported, to whom, and for what purpose. Without this review and the ability to deny an export application if necessary, it will be impossible to control exports of encryption to countless bad guys.
Page 27 - Whether we are surveilled by our government, by criminals, or by our neighbors, it is fair to say that never has our ability to shield our affairs from prying eyes been at such a low ebb. The availability and use of secure encryption may offer an opportunity to reclaim some portion of the privacy we have lost. Government efforts to control encryption thus may well implicate not only the First Amendment rights of cryptographers intent on pushing the boundaries of their science, but also the constitutional...
Page 16 - The Administration does not seek encryption export control legislation, nor do we believe such legislation is needed. The current regulatory structure provides for balanced oversight of export controls and the flexibility needed to adjust our economic — adjust it to our economic foreign policy and national security interests in light of advances in technology.
Page 9 - PREPARED STATEMENT OF HON. CLIFF STEARNS, A REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS FROM THE STATE OF FLORIDA Mr.
Page 5 - We are pleased now to welcome the chairman of the full committee, the gentleman from Richmond, Virginia, Mr. Bliley.
Page 10 - PREPARED STATEMENT OF HON. BARBARA CUBIN, A REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS FROM THE STATE OF WYOMING Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for holding this hearing.
Page 38 - Moreover, when we employ electronic methods of communication, we often leave electronic 'fingerprints' behind, fingerprints that can be traced back to us. Whether we are surveilled by our government, by criminals, or by our neighbors, it is fair to say that never has our ability to shield our affairs from prying eyes been at such a low ebb. The availability and use of secure encryption may offer an opportunity to reclaim some portion of the privacy we have lost. Government efforts to control encryption...
Page 39 - The bills provide that if strong encryption products have been permitted to be exported to foreign banks, then they should be exportable to other foreign commercial purchasers in that country. Note that the type of software and hardware we are talking about here is a "custom...

Bibliographic information