The Seventh Daughter: My Culinary Journey from Beijing to San Francisco

Front Cover
Ten Speed Press, 2007 - Cooking - 246 pages
4 Reviews
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A pioneer in the food world, Cecilia Chiang introduced Americans to authentic northern Chinese cuisine at her San Francisco restaurant, the Mandarin, in 1961, earning the adoration of generations of diners, including local luminaries such as Marion Cunningham, Ruth Reichl, and Chuck Williams. In THE SEVENTH DAUGHTER, Chiang presents a classic collection of recipes framed by her gripping life's story. Beginning with her account of a privileged childhood in 1920s and 1930s Beijing, Chiang chronicles a 1,000-mile trek on foot in the wake of the Japanese occupation, her arrival in San Francisco, and her transformation from accidental restaurateur to culinary pioneer. The book's recipes feature cherished childhood dishes and definitive Mandarin classics, while showcasing Cecilia's purist approach to authentic Chinese home cooking.

 The signature recipes and extraordinary story of Cecilia Chiang, the grande dame of Chinese cooking in America. Includes more than 80 recipes, 20 full-color styled food photographs, and archival photography from Chiang's private collection. Recipes feature in-depth notes on sourcing ingredients and tips on simplifying the recipes. Features menus for putting together Chinese banquets and dinners at home. Reviews“If The Seventh Daughter were filled only with her delicious, doable recipes, it would be a wonderful book. But it's also a moving memoir of a plucky woman who grew up in a Beijing palace anad has witnessed everything from foot binding to free love.”—O, The Oprah Magazine One of the Best Cookbooks of the Year: “Full of great food and life lessons.”—7 x 7One of the Best Cookbooks of the Year—Angeleno“Chiang's story is gripping.”—Los Angeles Times“Part memoir and part recipe collection, [Chiang] shares her favorite recipes alongside great stories.”—New York Times Book ReviewOne of the year's best cookbooks: “[A] fascinating book . . . Chiang's enticing, easy-to-follow recipes bridge the divide between restaurant and home cooking.”—Gourmet“This book, a memoir peppered with recipes, tells of a long, eventful life well-lived. Perfect for both cooks and those interested in Chinese culture.”—Chicago Tribune“A cookbook and a memoir woven together with precision and beauty.” —Portland Oregonian “This book is a connoisseur's delight, as well as an interesting glimpse into an extraordinary life.” —Seattle Times“A book that is hard to put down.”—Philadelphia Inquirer “The book authentically depicts Chinese food and culture. Perfect for Asian food fans.” —Solano magazine “A passionate story of food and perseverance.” —Marin magazine “Part cookbook, part memoir, it tells the fascinating story of Cecilia Chiang.” —San Jose Mercury News“Yes, the book is filled with many wonderful recipes, but it's Chiang's storytelling that's the real star.”—Foreword magazine“A tasty mix of personal history and recipes.”—More Magazine“[The Seventh Daughter] recounts a life filled with enough trauma, tragedy, and triumph for a Ken Burns epic.”—San Francisco Chronicle“A fascinating read.”—Library Journal“A rich, heartfelt volume filled with recipes and stories . . . Foodies intrigued by Chinese food and culinary history—and the life of a remarkable restaurateur—will relish the journey through this book.”—Publishers Weekly"It's a beautiful story...there's wonderful pictures in there and just great recipes."—Good Morning America

 
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - quondame - LibraryThing

A life story told somewhat dispassionately and in set pieces, but enlivened with memories of meaningful foods and meals. I know I dined at The Mandarin in Beverly Hills, and may well have in SF as ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Kellyannbrown - LibraryThing

Is it a cookbook? Is it an autobiography? Is it social commentary? I found this book to be all of these things. Cecilia Chiang has led an adventurous life, ranging from the acquisition of a bicycle, a ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION 1
1
Kum Kee are all good
6
THE MANDARIN 9
9
Famous Recipes from The Mandarin
26
THE SEVENTH DAUGHTER
47
LOVE AND MARRIAGE CHINESE STYLE
69
BICYCLES
89
Poultry
96
THE TOOLONG WALK PARTI
131
THE TOOLONG WALK PART II
149
A FORTUNATE COOKIE
169
SHANGHAIED TO TOKYO
189
Fish and Shellfish
204
SAYING GOODBYE
213
Desserts
223
Quick Recipes for Busy Cooks
232

RED ENVELOPES
109
Meats
115

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2007)

In 1961 CECILIA CHIANG opened the Mandarin, which became a San Francisco institution. In 1974 she wrote the cookbook The Mandarin Way, and her career blossomed to include television appearances, cooking demonstrations, and contributions to international magazines and newspapers. She consults for popular Bay Area restaurants, including Betelnut and Shanghai 1930. Chiang lives in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Bibliographic information