The Shoe Bird

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Univ. Press of Mississippi, 1993 - Juvenile Fiction - 87 pages
1 Review

When Arturo the Parrot, whose job it was to help greet people as they came into The Friendly Shoe Store, picked up and repeated a small boy's disgruntled comment, "Shoes are for the birds!," it certainly changed the course of his life. This is Eudora Welty's only book specifically written for young readers.

 

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THE SHOE BIRD

User Review  - Kirkus

"Shoes are for the birds!" yelled a little boy defiantly when he finally succeeded in getting his mother and sister out of The Friendly Shoe Store. Arturo, the parrot who lived in the store, took the ... Read full review

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This silly little chapter book is cheerful to read and even better to read aloud! The main character is a parrot who repeats everything he hears ("If you hear it, tell it") , and this habit sets events in motion that end up snowballing into a crazy party. Over the course of the night, he learns to think for himself instead of just repeat what he hears, and all the birds learn to value their special gifts. I recommend this book to everyone from 5 to 105... although I feel that some of the word play and puns might be lost on the youngest audience. 

Contents

Section 1
40
Section 2
55
Section 3
69
Section 4
79
Section 5
83
Section 6
85
Section 7
91
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Eudora Welty was born in Jackson, Mississippi on April 13, 1909. She was educated at the Mississippi State College for Women in Columbus, Mississippi, and at the University of Wisconsin. She moved to New York in 1930 to study advertising at the Columbia University business school. After her father's death, she moved back to Jackson in 1931. She held various jobs on local newspapers and at a radio station before becoming a publicity agent for the Works Progress Administration (WPA), part of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal program. Travelling through the state of Mississippi opened her eyes to the misery of the great depression and resulted in a series of photographs, which were exhibited in a one-women show in New York in 1936 and were eventually published as One Time, One Place: Mississippi in the Depression in 1971. She stopped working for the WPA in 1936. Her first stories, Magic and Death of a Travelling Salesman, were published in small magazines in 1936. Some of her better-known short stories are Why I Live at the P.O., Petrified Man, and A Worn Path. Her short story collections include A Curtain of Green, The Golden Apples, The Wide Net and Other Stories, and The Bride of Innisfallen and Other Stories. Her first novel, The Robber Bridegroom, was published in 1942. Her other novels include Delta Wedding, The Ponder Heart, Losing Battles, and The Optimist's Daughter, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1972. She received the gold medal for fiction from the National Institute of Arts and Letters in 1972. Her nonfiction works include A Snapshot Album, The Eye of the Storm: Selected Essays and Reviews, and One Writer's Beginnings. She died from complications following pneumonia on July 23, 2001 at the age of 92.

Children's book illustrator Beth Krush was born in Washington. She graduated from what is now the University of the Arts in 1939. She illustrated books both with and without her husband Joe Krush. They are best known for their work on the American edition of the five-book series The Borrowers by Mary Norton. In 1980, they received the Drexel Citation, which is given each year to a regional children's book author or illustrator. She also illustrated The Shoe Bird by Eudora Welty. She taught at Moore College of Art for 22 years. She died from complications following a stroke on February 2, 2009 at the age of 90.

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