The Soliloquies of St. Augustine

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Little, Brown, 1910 - Church history - 180 pages
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Contents

I
vii
II
1
III
10
IV
12
V
15
VI
19
VII
20
VIII
23
XX
59
XXI
62
XXII
65
XXIII
71
XXIV
73
XXV
75
XXVI
78
XXVII
80

IX
25
X
26
XI
28
XII
31
XIII
34
XIV
38
XV
41
XVI
45
XVII
51
XVIII
54
XIX
55

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Page 119 - one substance, with two sets of properties, two sides, the physical and the mental — a double-faced unity.
Page 150 - forgiven" and "covered," that Thou mightest make me happy in Thee, changing my soul by faith and Thy sacrament, — when they are read and heard, stir up the heart, that it sleep not in despair and say, "I cannot...
Page 137 - There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. The same came for a witness to bear witness of the light, that all men through him might believe. He was not that light, but was sent to bear witness of that light. That was the true light which lighteth every man that cometh into the world.
Page 119 - ... the promise and the potency of every form and quality of life.
Page 135 - I am not He;" and whatsoever are therein made the same confession. I asked the sea and the deeps, and the creeping things that lived, and they replied, " We are not thy God, seek higher than we.
Page 128 - I had shared with him, wanting him, became a distracting torture. Mine eyes sought him everywhere, but he was not granted them; and I hated all places, for that they had not him; nor could they now tell me, "he is coming," as when he was alive and absent.
Page 160 - For so I began, as a boy, to pray to Thee, my aid and refuge; and broke the fetters of my tongue to call on Thee, praying Thee, though small, yet with no small earnestness, that I might not be beaten at school. And when Thou heardest me not, (not thereby giving me over to folly) my elders, yea, my very parents, who yet wished me no ill, mocked my stripes, my then great and grievous ill.
Page 138 - We were saying, then, If to any man the tumult of the flesh were silenced, — silenced the phantasies of earth, waters, and air, — silenced, too, the poles; yea, the very soul be silenced to herself, and go beyond herself by not thinking of herself, — silenced fancies and imaginary revelations, every tongue, and every sign, and whatsoever exists by passing away, since, if any could hearken, all these say, "We created not ourselves, but were created by Him who abideth for ever...
Page 139 - Word, not through any tongue of flesh, nor Angel's voice, nor sound of thunder, nor in the dark riddle of a similitude, but, might hear Whom in these things we love, might hear His Very Self without these, (as we two now strained ourselves...

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