The Sources of Social Power: Volume 2, The Rise of Classes and Nation-States, 1760-1914

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 24, 2012 - History - 839 pages
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Distinguishing four sources of power in human societies - ideological, economic, military, and political - The Sources of Social Power traces their interrelations throughout human history. This second volume of Michael Mann's analytical history of social power deals with power relations between the Industrial Revolution and the First World War, focusing on France, Great Britain, Hapsburg Austria, Prussia/Germany and the United States. Based on considerable empirical research, it provides original theories of the rise of nations and nationalism, of class conflict, of the modern state and of modern militarism. While not afraid to generalize, it also stresses social and historical complexity. Michael Mann sees human society as "a patterned mess" and attempts to provide a sociological theory appropriate to this. This theory culminates in the final chapter, an original explanation of the causes of the First World War. First published in 1993, this new edition of volume 2 includes a new preface by the author examining the impact and legacy of the work.
 

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Contents

Britain 176041880
92
of confederal capitalist liberalism
137
and nations
214
national capitalism
297
II Austria and confederal
330
I Quantitative data
358
II The autonomy
402
civilian scope
479
The middleclass nation
546
Class struggle in the Second Industrial Revolution
597
movements
628
Classes states nations
723
Geopolitics
740
Appendix Additional tables on state finances and state
803
6
816
Copyright

The resistible rise of the British working class
511

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About the author (2012)

Michael Mann is Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of Power in the 21st Century: Conversations with John Hall (2011), Incoherent Empire (2003) and Fascists (Cambridge, 2004). His book The Dark Side of Democracy (Cambridge, 2004) was awarded the Barrington Moore Award of the American Sociological Association for the best book in comparative and historical sociology in 2006.

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