The Spanish Regime in Missouri: A Collection of Papers and Documents Relating to Upper Louisiana Principally Within the Present Limits of Missouri During the Dominion of Spain, from the Archives of the Indies at Seville, Etc., Translated from the Original Spanish Into English, and Including Also Some Papers Concerning the Supposed Grant to Col. George Morgan at the Mouth of the Ohio, Found in the Congressional Library, Volume 1

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R. R. Donnelley & sons Company, 1909 - Louisiana
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Page 303 - Every surveyor shall note in his field book, the true situations of all mines, salt licks, salt springs, and mill seats, which shall come to his knowledge...
Page 170 - May twenty-sixth at one o'clock in the afternoon, and began the attack upon the post from the north side, expecting to meet no opposition; but they found themselves unexpectedly repulsed by the militia which guarded it. A vigorous fire was kept up on both sides, so that by the service done by the cannon on the tower where the aforesaid commander...
Page 205 - English a,mong those tribes, and notwithstanding the small sum that we have, their hopes will prove empty, even though the [English] governor descend from Michilimakinak, which I doubt. At all events, the zeal, honor, and activity of Your Grace promises me a happy result on our part in their boasted attack on those settlements next spring. I approve the determination which Your Grace took with the tribes of the Misuri, in making them hand over the two English banners which had been introduced among...
Page 281 - Both this and the expediency of establishing the volunteers of Ireland I submit with great deference to your Lordship. In the meantime I shall give all encouragement to the recruiting of that corps, which I think may probably increase to a second battalion. I have the honor to be with the greatest respect, your Lordship's most obedient and most humble servant. H. CLINTON.
Page 147 - ... principal chief of this tribe is El Ladron [the Robber]. They are located eighty leagues distant from this village by water by the Misisipy River on the shores of the Muen River.84 This tribe is hostile to the tribes of the Misury River. Their occupation is that of hunting, but no benefit to [our] trade results therefrom, for the reason that the fur-trade is carried on continually with the traders who are entering that river from the English district.
Page 168 - For their garrison and that of the other posts, you would need 200 men, who would be divided in the manner set forth by Your Grace. I must inform you that, not only have I no authority to cause extraordinary expenses on the royal treasury, since that the situado (as Your Grace is not ignorant) of this province is reduced to the mere wages of the employes and the pay of the troops of the province, but that there is also added to this difficulty that of the garrison of all this colony being at present...
Page 208 - Chavalier, employed in the expedition ; and as a proof of his satisfaction with their service he has deigned to confer upon the first the rank of lieutenant in the army on half pay, and on the second that of sub-lieutenant on half pay, and to command that Your Excellency shall assign to the third such a gratification as shall appear appropriate.
Page 411 - Ohio seems kindly designed, by nature, as the channel, through which the two Floridas may be supplied with flour, not only for their own consumption, but also for carrying on an extensive commerce with Jamaica, and the Spanish settlements in the Bay of Mexico. Millstones, in abundance, are to be obtained in the hills near the Ohio; and the country is every where well watered with large and constant springs and streams for grist and other mills. The passage from Philadelphia to Pensacola is seldom...
Page 137 - ... a brilliant career, even had he not possessed other means of success. But to these advantages he joined that of being as powerfully connected as any subject in Spain. His father, Don Mathias de Galvez, was viceroy of Mexico, and his uncle, Don Joseph de Galvez, was almost king of Spain, for he was secretary of state and president of the council of the Indies, and was, as such, next to the crowned heads, the man who wielded the greatest power in Europe. In 1776, it had been stipulated between...
Page 237 - All its inhabitants having been obliged to retire with great haste to the mountains which are one league away from the said village. They abandoned their houses which were inundated, and their furniture and other possessions which they had in them. Although the waters have now fallen, those inhabitants remain along the said coast without yet knowing the place where they can settle...

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