The Standard Fifth Reader: (first-class Standard Reader) : for Public and Private Schools : Containing a Summary of Rules for Pronunciation and Elocution, Numerous Exercises for Reading and Recitation, a New System of References to Rules and Definitions, and a Copious Explanatory Index

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Philips, Sampson, 1858 - American literature - 478 pages
 

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Page 178 - Truth, crushed to earth, shall rise again, — The eternal years of God are hers; But Error, wounded, writhes in pain, And dies among his worshippers.
Page 271 - It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry, Peace, Peace — but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms! Our brethren are already in the field! Why stand we here idle? What is it that gentlemen wish ? What would they have ? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery ? Forbid it, Almighty God ! I know not what course others may take;...
Page 274 - For who, to dumb Forgetfulness a prey, This pleasing, anxious being e'er resigned; Left the warm precincts of the cheerful day, Nor cast one longing, lingering look behind?
Page 218 - Thus to relieve the wretched was his pride, And e'en his failings leaned to virtue's side ; But in his duty, prompt at every call, He watched and wept, he prayed and felt for all. And as a bird each fond endearment tries, To tempt its new-fledged offspring to the skies, He tried each art, reproved each dull delay, Allured to brighter worlds, and led the way.
Page 347 - Julius bleed for justice' sake ? What villain touched his body, that did stab, And not for justice ? What, shall one of us, That struck the foremost man of all this world, But for supporting robbers, shall we now Contaminate our fingers with base bribes, And sell the mighty space of our large honours For so much trash as may be grasped thus ? I had rather be a dog, and bay the moon, Than such a Roman.
Page 404 - And yet anon repairs his drooping head And tricks his beams, and with new-spangled ore Flames in the forehead of the morning sky...
Page 149 - Soon as the evening shades prevail, The moon takes up the wondrous tale ; And nightly, to the listening earth, Repeats the story of her birth...
Page 349 - O, I could weep My spirit from mine eyes ! There is my dagger, And here my naked breast ; within, a heart Dearer than Plutus' mine, richer than gold ; If that thou be'st a Roman, take it forth ; I, that denied thee gold, will give my heart ; Strike, as thou didst at Caesar ; for I know, When thou didst hate him worst, thou lovedst him better Than ever thou lovedst Cassius.
Page 405 - the cooling western breeze," In the next line, it "whispers through the trees:" If crystal streams "with pleasing murmurs creep...
Page 70 - The waves beside them danced; but they Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: A poet could not but be gay, In such a jocund company: I gazed— and gazed— but little thought What wealth the show to me had brought: For oft, when on my couch I lie In vacant or in pensive mood, They flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils.

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