The Story of Opal: The Journal of an Understanding Heart

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Atlantic monthly Press, 1920 - Authors, American - 283 pages
 

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Contents

I
ix
II
5
III
9
V
14
VI
21
VII
25
VIII
33
IX
45
XXX
156
XXXII
163
XXXIII
175
XXXIV
183
XXXV
191
XXXVI
195
XXXVII
202
XXXVIII
210

X
53
XI
67
XIII
73
XIV
79
XVI
89
XVIII
98
XIX
102
XXI
112
XXII
120
XXIII
125
XXV
129
XXVII
136
XXIX
144
XL
216
XLI
224
XLII
229
XLIII
232
XLIV
240
XLVI
247
XLVII
251
XLIX
257
LI
268
LII
273
LIII
282
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Page 154 - What the hammer? What the chain? In what furnace was thy brain? What the anvil? What dread grasp Dare its deadly terrors clasp? When the stars threw down their spears, And water'd heaven with their tears, Did He smile His work to see? Did He who made the lamb make thee...
Page 73 - There was a little dog and his name was Rover, and when he died, he died all over — and — when — he — died — he — died — all — over.
Page 29 - Man and the ones more 445 little are playing tag. I have thinks as how nice it would be to be having talks with Good King Edward I and lovely Queen Eleanor of Castile and Peter Paul Rubens and Brave Horatius and Lars Porsena of Clusium and Thomas Chatterton Jupiter Zeus and Aphrodite. And I do think this is a most long recess. I still do have hearings of the talkings of the girls outside the windows. The more old girls are talking what they want. Martha says she wants a bow. I don't have seeings...
Page 17 - I pinned up a corner of the fascinator. That made a warm place next to my curls for Felix Mendelssohn to ride in. I call this mouse Felix Mendelssohn because sometimes he makes very sweet music. Then I crossed to the cornfield. A cornfield is a very nice place, and some days we children make hair for our clothes-pin dolls from the silken tassels of the corn that grow in the grandpa's cornfield. Sometimes, which is quite often, we break the cornstalks in getting the silk tassels. That makes bumps...
Page 33 - Whiteley's father. piles I did stop to take looks at them. I walked up close. I looked them all over. I walked off and took a long look at them. Potatoes are very interesting folks. I think they must see a lot of what is going on in the earth. They have so many eyes. And after I did look those...
Page xii - WHTTELET was born about twenty-one years ago — where, we have no knowledge. Of her parents, whom she lost before her fifth year, she is sure of nothing except that they loved her, and that she loved them with a tenacity of affection as strong now as at the time of parting. To recall what manner of people they were, no physical proof remains except two precious little copybooks, which held their photographs, and wherein her mother and father had set down things which they wished their little daughter...
Page 10 - d have to keep still a long time. Now I think that would be the most awful thing that could happen, for I do so love to be active. So I always say a little prayer and do that jump in a careful way. To-day when I did jump, I did land right proper in that fir tree. It is such a comfort to nestle up to Michael Angelo Sanzio Raphael when one is in trouble. He is such a grand tree. He has an understanding soul. After I talked with him and listened unto his voice I slipped down out of his arms. I intended...
Page 35 - I am going to write for children — and grown-ups that have n't grown up too much — all the earthsongs I now do hear. I have thinks these potatoes growing here did have knowings of star-songs. I have kept watch in the field at night, and I have seen the stars look kindness down upon them. And I have walked between the rows of potatoes and I have watched the star-gleams on their leaves. And I have heard the wind ask of them the star-songs the star-gleams did tell in shadows on their leaves. And...
Page 11 - She put that bow in the trunk; me she put under the bed. By-and-by - some time long it was — she took me from under the bed and gave me a spanking. She did not have time to give me a spanking when she put me under the bed. She left me there until she did have time. After she did it she sent me to the ranch-house to get milk for the baby. I walked slow through the oak grove, looking for caterpillars. I found nine. Then I went to the pig-pen. The chore boy was fixing back the rails I had pulled down....
Page 74 - em what ye are a mind to, dearie." Sadie McKibben has an understanding soul. She keeps watch out of her window for seeings of Brave Horatius, and she has promised me she will ask everybody that she does see go by her house if they have had seeings of Brave Horatius. All my friends do feel lonesome feels for Brave Horatius. Lars Porsena of Clusium hardly has knowing what to do. And Peter Paul Rubens did have goings with me three times on searches. And when I did have stops to pray, he did grunt Amen.

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