The Strange Death of Liberal England

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Stanford University Press, 1935 - History - 364 pages
3 Reviews
This is a classic account, first published in 1935, of the dramatic upheaval and political change that overwhelmed England in the period 1910-1914. In addition to providing an account of the end of the House of Lords' absolute veto over legislation (as a result of the Lords' intransigence on the issue of Irish Home Rule), the book chronicles the sudden rise to power and influence of the women's suffrage movement, the upsurge in working-class militancy, and the bitterly fought Irish question.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - RobertP - LibraryThing

What a gem this book is. Unfortunately, one needs an adequate grounding in British history, social history, and literature to fully 'get' it, but still, an excellent read. Read full review

THE STRANGE DEATH OF LIBERAL ENGLAND

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Brilliantly clear, dryly humorous and surprisingly readable, is this lucid, masterly history of political England from 1910 to the outbreak of the war. A parallel book to The Road to War — sell to ... Read full review

Contents

Their Lordships Die in the Dark
15
Their Lordships Die in the Dark
37
Animula Vagula
69
The Womens Rebellion
121
The WorkersRebellion
178
Mutiny in the Curragh
269
The Guns of Larne
281
The Triple Alliance
312
Buckingham Palace to Bachelors Walk
328
The Lofty Shade
343
Index
359
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About the author (1935)

The late George Dangerfield wrote widely on both English and American History; he received both the Pulitzer Prize and the Bancroft Prize for The Era of Good Feelings. Among his other books are The Bengal Mutiny, Victoria's Heir: The Education of a Prince, The Awakening of American Nationalism, 1815-1828, and The Damnable Question: A Study in Anglo-Irish Relations.

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