The Style and Rhetoric of Elizabeth Dole: Public Persona and Political Discourse

Front Cover
Lexington Books, Dec 18, 2013 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 140 pages
This book analyses the public discourse of Elizabeth Dole. It explores the way in which this trail-blazing public figure navigated the double binds that confront women who obtain and exercise political power. The text argues that Dole crafted a conservative, feminine persona in which she depicted herself as a selfless public servant. This sense of servant was defined through Dole’s appeal to the transcendent moral purposes of Christianity. She used this image to great effect in her most noteworthy public addresses, especially her 1996 Republican National Convention speech in support of her husband’s presidential campaign. In her 2008 unsuccessful North Carolina U.S. Senate reelection campaign Elizabeth Dole’s political style unraveled in the face of a series of effective attacks by her opponent, Kay Hagan, and her own desperate rhetorical appeals to stave off defeat.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Doles Personal Life
1
Womens Struggles with Power in Politics
15
Analysis of Doles Public Persona
23
The Unraveling of Elizabeth Doles Image
47
Conclusion
79
Appendix A
89
Appendix B
97
Appendix C
101
Appendix D
105
Appendix E
109
Appendix F
113
References
117
Index
127
About the Authors
131
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2013)

Rachel Friedman is assistant professor of communication studies at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

Ronald Lee is professor of communication studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Bibliographic information