The Subject of Care: Feminist Perspectives on Dependency

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Associate Professor of Philosophy Eva Feder Kittay, Eva Feder Kittay, Ellen K. Feder, Assistant Professor of Philosophy Ellen K Feder
Rowman & Littlefield, 2002 - Philosophy - 382 pages
All people spend a considerable portion of their lives either as dependents or the caretakers of dependents. The fact of human dependency--a function of youth, severe illness, disability, or frail old age--marks our lives, not only as those who are cared for, but as those who engage in the work of caring. In spite of the time, energy and resources-material and emotional, social and individual-that dependency care requires, these concerns rarely enter into philosophical, legal, and political discussions. In The Subject of Care, feminist scholars consider how acknowledgement of the fact of dependency changes our conceptions of law, political theory, and morality, as well as our very conceptions of self. Contributors develop feminist understandings of dependency, reassessing the place dependency occupies in our lives and in a just social order.
 

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Contents

A Genealogy of Dependency Tracing a Keyword of the US Welfare State
14
Autonomy Welfare Reform and Meaningful Work
40
Dependency and Choice The Two Faces of Eve
61
LEGAL AND ECONOMIC RELATIONS IN THE FACE OF DEPENDENCY
87
The Right to Care
88
Subsidized Lives and the Ideology of Efficiency
115
Dependency Work Women and the Global Economy
138
JUST SOCIAL ARRANGEMENTS AND FAMILIAL RESPONSIBILITY FOR DEPENDENCY
159
The Decasualization of Eldercare
246
When Caring Is Just and Justice Is Caring Justice and Mental Retardation
257
Poverty Rate and the Distortion of Dependency The Case of Kinship Care
277
Doctors Orders Parents and Intersexed Children
294
DEPENDENCY SUBJECTIVITY AND IDENTITY
321
Subjectivity as Responsivity The Ethical Implications of Dependency
322
Race and the Labor of Identity
334
Dependence on Place Dependence in Place
348

Justice and the Labor of Care
160
The Future of Feminist Liberalism
186
Masking Dependency The Political Role of Family Rhetoric
215
DEPENDENCY CARE IN CASES OF SPECIFIC VULNERABILITY
245
Index
369
About the Contributors
379
Copyright

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Page 1 - Now, what peculiarly signalizes the situation of woman is that she — a free and autonomous being like all human creatures — nevertheless finds herself living in a world where men compel her to assume the status of the Other.
Page 9 - The conditionings associated with a particular class of conditions of existence produce habitus, systems of durable, transposable dispositions, structured structures predisposed to function as structuring structures, that is, as principles which generate and organize practices and representations that can be objectively adapted to their outcomes without presupposing a conscious aiming at ends or an express mastery of the operations necessary in order to attain them. Objectively 'regulated

About the author (2002)

Eva Feder Kittay is professor of philosophy at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and the author, most recently, of Love's Labor: Essays on Women, Equality, and Dependence. Ellen K. Feder is assistant professor of philosophy at American University. The pair have also coedited a special issue of Hypatia on the family and feminist theory.

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