How to Measure Survey Reliability and Validity

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SAGE Publications, Aug 3, 1995 - Social Science - 96 pages

Improving the accuracy of a survey is the focus of Mark S. Litwin's book, which shows how to assess and interpret the quality of survey data by thoroughly examining the survey instrument used. He explains how to code and pilot test new and established surveys. In addition, he covers issues such as: how to measure reliability (including test-retest, alternate form, internal consistency, inter-observer and intra-observer reliability); how to measure validity (including content, criterion and construct validity); how to address cross-cultural issues in survey research; and how to scale and score a survey.

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Contents

alidity
33
Scaling and Scoring
47
Creating and Using a Codebook
53
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Chair, Department of Urology. Professor of Urology and Public Health. He trained at Harvard and specializes in testicular, bladder, prostate and kidney cancer. Dr. Litwin’s research focuses on improving quality of care and quality of life in urologic oncology. He leads Urologic Diseases in America (www.udaonline.net), the NIH’s largest effort at documenting the burden of urologic diseases on the American people. He also created and directs IMPACT, a state-funded program that provides free medical care statewide for low-income, uninsured men with prostate cancer (www.california-impact.org).

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