The TDR Handbook: Designing and Implementing Transfer of Development Rights Programs

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Island Press, Feb 22, 2013 - Architecture - 341 pages
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"Transfer of Development Rights" (TDR) programs allow local governments to put economic principles to work in encouraging good land use planning. TDR programs most often permit landowners to forfeit development rights in areas targeted for preservation and then sell those development rights to buyers who want to increase the density of development in areas designated as growth areas by local authorities.
 
Although TDR programs must conform to zoning laws, they provide market incentives that make them more equitable (and often more lucrative) for sellers and frequently benefit buyers by allowing them to receive prior approval for their high-density development plans. Since the 1970s when modern TDR applications were first conceived, more than 200 communities in 33 states across the U.S. have implemented TDR-based programs. The most common uses of TDR to date involve protecting farmland, environmentally sensitive land, historic sites, and "rural character," and urban revitalization.
 
Until now, however, there has never been a clearly written, one-volume book on the subject. At last, The TDR Handbook provides a comprehensive guide to every aspect of TDR programs, from the thinking behind them to the nuts and bolts of implementation-including statutory guidance, model ordinances, suggestions for program administration, and comparisons with other types of preservation programs. In addition, six of its twenty chapters are devoted to case studies of all major uses to which TDR programs have been utilized to date, including recent urban revitalization projects that utilize TDR principles.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 How TDRs Work
3
Chapter 2 Comparing TDRs to Other Preservation Solutions
15
Chapter 3 The Economics of TDRs
27
Chapter 4 Purchase of Development Rights
41
Chapter 5 Density Transfer Charges
45
PART 2
51
Chapter 6 TDRs and the Planning Connection
53
Chapter 7 The Seven Steps of TDR Planning
63
Chapter 14 Farmland Preservation Case Studies
141
Chapter 15 Farmland and Environmental Preservation Case Studies
159
Chapter 16 Environmental Preservation Case Studies
179
Chapter 17 Rural Character Preservation Case Studies
193
Chapter 18 Historic Preservation Case Studies
207
Chapter 19 Urban Design and Revitalization Case Studies
217
The Promise and Future of TDRs
229
A Model TDR Ordinance
241

Chapter 8 Designing Sending Areas
75
Chapter 9 Designing Receiving Areas
85
PART 3
93
Chapter 10 Legal Issues
95
Chapter 11 A Review of State Statutes
105
Chapter 12 TDR Program Administration
119
PART 4
129
Chapter 13 Programs by Purpose
131
Sample TDR form
253
State Listings of TDR Programs
259
Glossary
285
Notes
287
References and Selected Bibliography
295
Contributors
305
Index
307
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Arthur C. (Christian "Chris") Nelson, FAICP, is Presidential Professor of City & Metropolitan Planning at the University of Utah where he is also Director of the Metropolitan Research Center and Adjunct Professor of Finance in the David Eccles School of Business. Dr. Nelson has conducted pioneering research in growth management, urban containment, public facility finance, economic development, and metropolitan development patterns. 
  Rick Pruetz, FAICP, was the City Planner of Burbank, California before becoming a planning consultant specializing in TDR workshops, feasibility studies and ordinances. He has written three books on TDR as well as articles on TDR for numerous publications including the Journal of the American Planning Association, Planning and Environmental Law and the Planning Advisory Service Memo
Doug Woodruff, RLA, LEED AP, is a Landscape Architect practicing in Salt Lake City. He works with communities in open space planning, urban revitalization, and economic development. In addition to a landscape architecture degree, Woodruff has a master of real estate development degree specializing in urban redevelopment, real estate finance, and preservation.

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