The Tale of Genji

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Feb 6, 2013 - Fiction - 384 pages
2 Reviews
In the eleventh century Murasaki Shikibu, a lady in the Heian court of Japan, wrote the world's first novel. But The Tale of Genji is no mere artifact. It is, rather, a lively and astonishingly nuanced portrait of a refined society where every dalliance is an act of political consequence, a play of characters whose inner lives are as rich and changeable as those imagined by Proust. Chief of these is "the shining Genji," the son of the emperor and a man whose passionate impulses create great turmoil in his world and very nearly destroy him. This edition, recognized as the finest version in English, contains a dozen chapters from early in the book, carefully chosen by the translator, Edward G. Seidensticker, with an introduction explaining the selection. It is illustrated throughout with woodcuts from a seventeenth-century edition.
 

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Review: Tale of Genji

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The Tale of Genji aka Genji Monogatari is one of the most revered works of literature in Japan and its female author wrote this originally almost 1000 years ago in the 11th century! It is a tale of ... Read full review

The tale of Genji

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Written in the 11th century, Lady Murasaki's account of court life in Heian Japan stands as one of the undisputed monuments of world literature and one of the first novels in the modern sense of ... Read full review

Contents

PRINCIPAL cnmucmzs
1
The Paulownia Court
3
Evening Faces
28
Lavender
65
An Autumn Excursion
107
The Festival of the Cherry Blossoms
134
Heartvine
146
The Sacred Tree
186
The Orange Blossoms
231
Suma
236
Akashi
279
Channel Buoys
316
I2 A Picture Contest
345
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About the author (2013)

Murasaki Shikibu, a lady in the Heian court of Japan, is best known as the author of The Tale of Genjiwritten in the eleventh century and universally recognized as the greatest masterpiece of Japanese prose narrative and possibly the earliest true novel in the history of the world.

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