The Tao of Abundance: Eight Ancient Principles for Living Abundantly in the 21st Century

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Penguin, Nov 1, 1999 - Philosophy - 400 pages
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Through his intelligent, appealing integration of Eastern philosophy and practical advice, Laurence G. Boldt has helped thousands of readers find personal satisfaction in their work and personal lives. Now he applies these principles to the subject of abundance: How do we achieve material wealth without sacrificing our souls?In The Tao of Abundance, Boldt applies ancient wisdom to modern times, presenting eight guiding principles from Taoist philosophy geared to help readers make practical life changes that will bring them a truer and deeper sense of abundance. Boldt encourages readers to strike a balance between material and spiritual wealth--not to favor one over the other--and argues that increased material wealth comes as a natural byproduct of psychological fulfillment. With exercises designed to help readers find their own balance between societal demands and their own deepest desires, this helpful, inspiring book offers the chance to experience a new feeling of abundance in all aspects of life.
 

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User Review  - martyr13 - LibraryThing

One of the most inspirational books I have ever read. Mr. Boldt has a refreshing and relevant world view. I recommend this book for anyone looking to incorporate the ancient principles of taoism into the post-modern world. Read full review

Contents

The Second Cutting of the Umbilical Cord
The Good with the Bad
The Dignity of Following Your Nature
The Strength of Your Nature
Moving in the Flow
Balancing Nature and Society
Dignity and The Rule of Society
The Artificial Society

The Tao of the Ten Thousand Things and Abundance
The Social Tao the Way of Humanity
The Social Tao and Abundance
Trusting the Tao or Swimming in What Is
Whos in Charge Around Here Anyway?
Can We Trust an Intelligence That Isnt a Boss?
Antagonistic or Unified Universe
The Separation of the Ego or Why It Cannot Trust the Tao
Why Do We Need An Ego?
Three Eyes on the World
Integrating the Ego
Private I Private Property
Mastering the Present Era of Private Property
Name That Ego
Using without Possessing
More Blessed to Receive
Receiving Is an Intentional Act
Receptivity and Intelligence
The Nature of Receptivity
Desensitization in the Machine Civilization
Receptivity and the Ego
Conditioned Responses
Breaking Through the Mental Fog
Concentration By Will Power
The Art of Becoming One With
Unexamined Beliefs
Observing and Directing the Mind
Turning Off the Mind
The Struggle for Survival Revisited
The Universe Is Against Me
They Are Against Me
You Are Against Me
I Am Against Me
Creating With Ease
At Ease with Yourself
Circulation of Chi
Joy Is in the Circle
The Circulation of Wealth
The Great Chi Robber
Keep It Moving
Cultivating Chi
The Dignity of SelfReliance
The Rule of Money
Banking on Inflation
Two Sides of the Same Coin
Yin Contains Yang Yang Yin
Yin Transforms Yang Yang Transforms Yin
Contrasting Ideas of Enjoyment and Abundance
Modern Society and the Decline of Leisure
The Big Time Spilt
The Drive for Efficiency
The Drive for Increased Consumption
An Abundance of Leisure
Leisure to Be
The Leisure to Grow
The Leisure to Relate
The Principle of Beauty
The Rhythm of Beauty
The Pattern of the Mind
The Role of Art
The Creative Life
The Beauty of Excellence
Walk in a Beauty Way
Beauty in the Little Things
A Beautiful Gift
CHAPTER 1
CHAPTER 2
CHAPTER 3
CHAPTER 4
CHAPTER 5
CHAPTER 6
CHAPTER 7
CHAPTER 8
AFFIRMATIONS
THE FIVE FINGERS OF THE TAO
INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER TWO
CHAPTER THREE
CHAPTER FOUR
CHAPTER FIVE
CHAPTER SIX
CHAPTER SEVEN
CHAPTER EIGHT
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About the author (1999)

Laurence G. Boldt is a writer, career consultant, and lifetime student of Eastern philosophies, with more than a decade of experience helping people shape their dreams into practical realities. He is the bestselling author of Zen and the Art of Making a Living, How to Find the Work You Love, and Zen Soup. He lives in Santa Barbara, California..

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