The Tao of Public Service: A Memoir: On Seeking True Purpose

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BalboaPress, Feb 14, 2013 - Biography & Autobiography - 282 pages
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As a little one, hearing JFK speak for the first time made me want to be just like him. For some reason, his words went straight to my heart, filling my heart with something wonderful. It is a feeling that I later came to understand as a desire to serve—to pursue a life of public service. My desire was for this ideal. These feelings have taken me on a long and tortuous journey. I have been a public servant most of my life. I have gone from a poor little black child, laborer, contractor, and teacher, to politician, lawyer, and judge. But strangely enough, my journey did not end there. My journey did not end with political success. Strangely enough, I discovered that my desire and my ideal meant something deeper and even more wonderful. I discovered that it meant something above and beyond politics—something for everyone. I discovered something good for every single person: the ideal life, a life of true purpose. Not something for the far-distant future, but something that can be achieved in the here and now. And I want to share my experiences of this process (the Tao) with you.
 

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Contents

1 CHARACTER
1
2 SPIN INFORMATION AND TRUTH
15
3 SUBSTANCE ABUSE MENTAL HEALTH AND THERAPEUTIC COURTS
41
4 OUR ECONOMY AND THE BARONS OF WALL STREET
49
IDEALSTHE BETTER ANGELS OF OUR NATURE
61
5 LABOR
63
6 INDEPENDENCE
85
7 HEROES AND COURAGE
97
10 THE IDEAL OF RESPONSIBILITY
167
11 PUBLIC SERVICE AS A WAY OF LIFE TAO
173
12 INSIGHT AND THE PROCESS OF ASSIMILATION
191
INSIGHT AND IDEALISM
213
Index
221
EPILOGUE
227
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
229
END NOTES
231

8 FAITH OPTIMISM AND HOPE
141
9 HONESTY AND TRUTH
159

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About the author (2013)

Eric Z. Lucas has been a public servant most of his career life: a prosecuting attorney, a city attorney, and a trial judge. He is the first person of color in county history to serve as an elected official. Married to his wife, Beth, since 1974, they have four children.

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