The Teachings of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of Knowledge

Front Cover
University of California Press, 1968 - Hallucinogenic drugs and religious experience - 196 pages
14 Reviews
Published in 1968 when Carlos Castaneda was still a graduate student in anthropology at the University of California, Los Angeles, The Teachings of Don Juan experienced extraordinary success and generated intense controversy. Read by over a million readers worldwide, the book introduced many to shamanic traditions and the use of hallucinogenic drugs. The authenticity of the text was questioned by scholars when Castaneda refused to reveal the identity of his teacher, Don Juan Matus. Whether read as ethnographic fact or creative fiction, The Teachings of Don Juan remains an important document in late-twentieth-century American culture.

The Teachings of Don Juan initiated a generation of seekers dissatisfied with the limitations of the Western worldview. Castaneda’s now classic book remains controversial for the alternative way of seeing that it presents and the revolution in cognition it demands.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
3
3 stars
4
2 stars
2
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Phoenixangelfire - LibraryThing

On of my all time favourites that set he pace for me to read the sequels. Each time I was not disappointed wither with the writings or the story line. While there is the official story there is also a ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - joeydag - LibraryThing

I read this so long ago. Pretty much an enticing con. Don't expect a ringing endorsement from me for shamanistic teachings of an esoteric nature. It was groovy back in the day of "opening the doors of perception" - not so much so in the day of "where did I leave my glasses again". Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
11

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1968)

Every aspect of Carlos Castaneda's life, from his literary credibility and marital history to his place of birth and circumstances of death, are shrouded in mystery. Born Carlos Aranha, Castaneda graduated from the University of California at Los Angeles in the mid-1960s, and soon after he published the first of eight best-selling novels detailing his purported apprenticeship with a Yaqui Indian wizard named Don Juan Matus. Castaneda's books, among them The Techniques of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of Knowledge and The Wheel of Time: The Shamans of Ancient Mexico, Their Thoughts about Life, Death and the Universe, have sold over eight million copies, in 17 languages, around the world. Little is known about Castaneda's personal life. He was briefly married to Margaret Runyan in 1960. They only lived together as man and wife for six months before going to Mexico for a divorce. In 1973, after realizing that their first divorce was not legal, Castaneda and Runyan were formally divorced. Castaneda died of cancer on April 27, 1998, at his home in Westwood, California. His death was kept a secret for more than two months before word of it was finally leaked to the press.

Bibliographic information