The Tears of the Indians: Being an Historical and True Account of the Cruel Massacres and Slaughters of Above Twenty Millions of Innocent People Committed by the Spaniards in the Islands of Hispaniola, Cuba, Jamaica, Etc. As Also, in the Continent of Mexico, Peru, and Other Places of the West Indies, to the Total Destruction of Those Countries

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Academic Reprints, 1656 - Indians, Treatment of - 126 pages
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Page 6 - Overrunning Cities and Villages, where they spared no sex nor age; neither would their cruelty pity Women with childe, whose bellies they would rip up, taking out the Infant to hew it in pieces. They would often lay wagers who should with most dexterity either cleave or cut a man in the middle. . . . The children they would take by the feet and dash their innocent heads against the rocks...
Page 2 - In writing of the Spanish conquest of the Caribbean, Las Casas stated that the Spanish viewed American Indians "not like beasts, for that would have been tolerable, but look upon them as if they had been but the dung and filth of the earth
Page 87 - ... monsters, that are frequent in those seas. Consider whether this hard usage of the poor creatures be consistent with the precepts which God commands concerning charity to our neighbor, by those that cast them so undeservedly into the dangers of a cruel death, causing them to perish without any remorse or pity, or allowing them the benefit of the Sacraments, or the knowledge of Religion; it being impossible for them to live any time under the water; and this death is so much the more painful,...
Page 86 - Pearl, with small portion of that bread which that Country affords; in the first whereof there is little nourishment; and as for the latter, it is made with great difficulty, besides that they have not enough of that neither for sustenance; they lie upon the ground in fetters, lest they should run away; and many times they are drown'd in this labor, and are never seen again till they swim upon the top of the waves; oftentimes they also are devoured by certain sea monsters...
Page 86 - BARTOLOME DE LAS CASAS, THE TEARS OF THE INDIANS There is nothing more detestable or more cruel than the tyranny which the Spaniards use toward the Indians for the getting of pearl. Surely the infernal torments cannot much exceed the anguish that they endure, by reason of that way of cruelty; for they put them under water some four or five ells deep, where they are forced without any liberty of respiration, to gather up the shells wherein the Pearls are; sometimes they come up again with nets full...
Page 9 - ... they would take by the feet and dash their innocent heads against the rocks, and when they were fallen into the water, with a strange and cruel derision they would call on them to swim. . . . They erected certain Gallowses . . . upon every one of which they would hang thirteen persons, blasphemously affirming that they did it in honour of our Redeemer and his Apostles, and then putting fire under them, they burnt the poor wretches alive.
Page 9 - They erected certain Gallowses, that were broad but so low, that the tormented creatures might touch the ground with their feet, upon every one of which they would hang thirteen persons, blasphemously affirming that they did it in honour of our Redeemer and his Apostles, and then putting fire under them, they burnt the poor wretches alive.
Page 105 - ... an infinite number of people; for he among all those who have done most mischeife in ruining both Provinces and Kingdoms, is famous for his savage fury: wherefore I am apt to believe that God hath put the same end to his life as to the others.

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