The technology of orgasm: "hysteria," the vibrator, and women's sexual satisfaction

Front Cover
The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999 - Medical - 181 pages
From the time of Hippocrates until the 1920s, massaging female patients to orgasm was a staple of medical practice among Western physicians in the treatment of "hysteria," an ailment once considered both common and chronic in women. Doctors loathed this time-consuming procedure and for centuries relied on midwives. Later, they substituted the efficiency of mechanical devices, including the electric vibrator, invented in the 1880s. In The Technology of Orgasm, Rachel Maines offers readers a stimulating, surprising, and often humorous account of hysteria and its treatment throughout the ages, focusing on the development, use, and fall into disrepute of the vibrator as a legitimate medical device.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - damsorrow - LibraryThing

WERE YOU AWARE: That hysteria means "womb disease?" That"Susan B Anthony is said to have regarded male behavior at sports events as evidence that men were too emotional to be allowed to vote?" Or ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - SimonW11 - LibraryThing

This well researched little gem soon makes it apparent with its discussion of such things as devices for treating sexual frustration in medeaval nuns, the development of steam powered and clockwork ... Read full review

Contents

3
48
4
67
5
101
Copyright

1 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1999)

Rachel P. Maines is an independent scholar and a technical processing assistant at Cornell University's Hotel School Library. She is also the author of numerous articles in scholarly and popular publications.