The Terrible meek: a one-act stage play for three voices: to be played in darkness

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Harper & Brothers, 1912 - 43 pages
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Page 39 - ... did possess it: not the proud: not the idle, not the wealthy, not the vaunting empires of the world. Something has happened up here on this hill to-day to shake all our kingdoms of blood and fear to the dust. The earth is his, the earth is theirs, and they made it. The meek, the terrible meek, the fierce agonizing meek, are about to enter into their inheritance.
Page 35 - WOMAN. [In a stupor.] I want to. I'm trying to. But you say you killed my son. CAPTAIN. Oh! . . . WOMAN. Why did you do it? CAPTAIN. I did not know. Killing's my trade. It was the only thing they brought me up to do. [She does not answer.] I have been mixed up with it ever since I can remember. My father did it before me. All my people did it. It is considered the thing — the sort of thing a gentleman ought to do. They call it glory; they call it honor; courage; patriotism. Great kings hold their...
Page 31 - The wide asking eyes of you, your little hand, how it would go out so and so, your little tongue all a-clatter, the ways, the wonderings of you, and the heartbreak, the heartbreak when we had you lost. Talking to the good priests, you said. Good priests! My God! It began that day, that bitter day of the fairing when we went up to the big city. I lost you then. I have lost you ever since. Oh, the big city, the cruel city, the city of men's sin! Calling, calling the sweet life of a man and swallowing...
Page 38 - It springs from fear — a peculiar kind of fear they call courage. And so we go on building our kingdoms — the kingdoms of this world. We stretch out our hands, greedy, grasping, tyrannical, to possess the earth. Domination, power, glory, money, merchandise, luxury, these are the things we aim at; but what we really gain is pest and famine, grudge labour, the enslaved hate of men and women, ghosts, dead and death-breathing ghosts that haunt our lives forever. It can't last: it never has lasted,...
Page 39 - I tell you, woman, this dead son of yours, disfigured, shamed, spat upon, has built a kingdom this day that can never die. The living glory of him rules it. The earth is his and he made it. He and his brothers have been...
Page 39 - Kingdom this day that can never die. The living glory of Him rules it. The earth is His and He made it. He and His brothers have been molding and making it through the long ages; they are the only ones who ever really did possess it: not the proud; not the idle; not the vaunting empires of the world.
Page 41 - ... again. What he done, puts all things back again, where they belong. CAPTAIN. I can see the end of war in this: some day. WOMAN. I can see the joy of women and little children: some day. CAPTAIN. I can see cities and great spaces of land full of happiness. WOMAN. I can see love shining in every face. CAPTAIN. There shall be no more sin, no pain. . . . WOMAN. No loss, no death. . . . CAPTAIN. Only life, only God. . . . WOMAN. And the kingdom of my Son. . . . CAPTAIN. Some day. WOMAN. When the world...
Page 42 - ill, thank Gawd! The General wants ter see you, sir. CAPTAIN. What does he want with me? Do you know? SOLDIER. Another of these 'ere bleedin' jobs, I think, sir. Been a bit of a disturbance dahn in the tahn. The boys 'ave their orders, sir. General wants you ter take command. CAPTAIN. Tell him I refuse to come. SOLDIER. Beg pawdon, sir. CAPTAIN. I refuse to come. I disobey. SOLDIER. I don't think I quite 'eard, sir.
Page 42 - ave their orders, sir. General wants you ter take command. CAPTAIN. Tell him I refuse to come. CAPTAIN. I refuse to come. I disobey. SOLDIER. I don't think I quite 'card, sir. CAPTAIN. I disobey. I have sworn duty to another General. I serve the Empire no longer. SOLDIER. Beg pawdon, sir, it's not for the likes of me; but . . . Well, you know wot that means. CAPTAIN. Perfectly. It means what you call death. Tell the General. SOLDIER. Tell 'im as you refuse to obey orders, sir? CAPTAIN. His: yes....
Page 1 - TO MY MOTHER A NEWER COURAGE. MORE LIKE WOMAN'S. DEALING WITH LIFE. NOT DEATH. IT CHANGES EVERYTHING PERSONS OF THE PLAY A PEASANT WOMAN AN ARMY CAPTAIN A SOLDIER THE TIME A TIME OF DARKNESS THE PLACE A WIND-SWEPT HILL THE TERRIBLE MEEK THE TERRIBLE MEEK Before the curtain rises, a bell from some distant place of worship tolls the hour. Nine brazen notes, far off, out of tune. Then a heavy peal of thunder, and the sharp, cracking strike of a bolt; yet, above all, one other sound, more piercing —...

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