The Tewa World: Space, Time, Being, and Becoming in a Pueblo Society

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University of Chicago Press, Feb 15, 1972 - History - 197 pages
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This book is not a descriptive monograph, but an essay in cultural analysis, one which views culture as a system of symbols and which takes form under the impact of modern structural theory. A theme which runs throughout is the concept of dual organization, a structure which once characterized ten to fifteen percent of all known human societies, and which is found in a highly developed form among the Tewa today. Defined as "a system of antithetical institutions with the associated symbols, ideas, and meanings in terms of which social interaction takes place," a dual organization is for the Tewa a natural result of adapting to an environment comprised of opposites--two extremes of weather during the year; two means of subsistence, hunting in winter and farming in summer; and two periods and directions of migration in the origin myth.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
In the Beginning
13
The Dry Food People and the Dry Food Who Are No Longer
29
The Towa e
61
The Made People and the Dry Food Who Never Did Become
79
Summary and Conclusions
121
NOTES
139
BIBLIOGRAPHY
181
INDEX
187
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