The Theory and Practice of Banking, Volume 2

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Longmans, Green, Reader, & Dyer, 1886 - Banks and banking
 

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Contents

10
25
Mr Fox declares it to be a fantastical opinion that paper
31
Evidence of Mr Chambers
32
Mr Loyds opinion
35
Great rise in the market price of gold
39
The circulation of Scotch 1 notes in England forbidden 129
49
Another illustration
52
Regolutions of Mr Vansittart
54
Mr Canning tries to persuade Mr Vansittart to abstain from pressing his resolution
55
Letter of Lord King
56
Lord Stanhopes Act in 1811
57
Observations of Lord Stanhope
58
The same continued
59
Great speculations and increase of country banks in 1813
60
Great destruction of country bank paper in 1816 rise in the foreign exchanges and fall in the market price of gold
61
Which is an example of the truth of the principles of the Bullion Report
62
Partial resumption of cash payments in 1816
63
Great drain of bullion in 181819appointment of Com mittee by both Houses of Parliament to enquire into the expediency of resuming cash payments
64
Opinion of Mr Dorrein Governor of the Bank
65
Opinion of Mr Pole DeputyGovernor of the Bank
66
The same continued
67
Opinion of Mr Ward Director of the Bank
71
Opinion of Mr Samuel Thornton lato Director of the Bank
72
Opinion of Mr Thomas Tooke
74
Opinion of Mr Ricardo 75 仍 122 Opinion of Mr Baring
77
Opinion of Mr John Ward
79
Reports of the Committees to both Houses
80
Ministerial resolutions
81
Speeches of Lord Lauderdalo and Lord King
83
Speech of Lord Grenville
86
CHAPTER XI
96
tinent than in England
103
Mr Barings condemnation of the small notes
123
Position of the Bank in 18333435
138
The bank rate of discount much below the market rate
144
CHAPTER XII
150
Errors committed by him
151
Continuation of Sir Robert Peels speech
152
Unfairness of his illustration
153
Continuation of Sir Robert Peels speech
155
Further proposals of Sir Robert Peel
156
Extract from Sir Charles Woods speech
157
Chief provisions of the Act
158
The Act authorises a violation of its own principle
160
Incorrect to say that the Act of 1844 is the complement of the Act of 1819
161
Great error of writers who think that prices must vary exactly with the amount of the Currency
162
The Bank Act shewn to be subject to the same radical vice as the bank principle of 1832
165
Passes off after the first week of May 107
167
Great failures in the Autumn of 1817
168
Unsound state of commercial credit in 1817the panic 108
170
Extraordinary aid afforded by the Bank of England to Com mercial houses in the Autumn of 1817
171
Meeting of Parliament in November 1847
172
Speech of Sir Robert Peel
175
The same continued
176
Opinion of the Governor and DeputyGovernor of the Bank of England on the Act of 1814
177
Jr Gurneys opinion
178
Mr Herries motion
180
Remarkable difference between the rates of discount of
196
Bullion is only the regulator of its amount
276
Nature of Banking
278
CHAPTER XV
287
Judicial decisions as to the meaning of Currency
293
All Negotiable Instruments are Currency
304
AttorneyGen 456 494
307
Writers who include Bank Credits as Currency
312
Lord Overstone on Currency
319
Legal and philosophical errors of these opinions
326
Opinion of M Michel Chevalier
333
On the causes which compelled the Suspension of the Bank
348
When the Foreign Exchanges are adverse the Bank must
350
Examination of the arguments alleged for maintaining
360
Constitution of the Directorate of the Bank
366
Mr Lowe on Commercial Panics
368
The Bank Act has rendered all banking illegal
371
The Cheque Bank
374
Illegality of this Bank
375
An Inquiry into the Banking System of the country will become necessary
378
CHAPTER XVII
379
1823
381
Statute of 1826 permitting Joint Stock Banks of Issue 65
382
Slow progress in forming Joint Stock Banks
383
Regulations of Bank Charter Act 1833
384
Joint Stock Banks founded in London
385
Contest of Joint Stock Banks with the Bank
386
Statute of 1838 c 96
387
Committees of House of Commons on Joint Stock Banks
388
Limited liability conceded to Banks
389
Causes of the failure of Joint Stock Banking in England
390
Original monopoly of Banking injurious
391
Consequences of this monopoly 339
394
Modern commercial ideas
395
Decay of private Banking 336
396
Statutes of 1858 and 1879 extending limited liability to Banks
400
CHAPTER XVIII
402
Relation of Banker to customer as Agent Trustee
408
Bankers as Agents or Correspondents of other bankers
415
Advances on loan with security
424
On the Clearing System
435
On the London Clearing House
443
Bulteel
451
On Goods taken as Security
452
On Securities by third persons
459
Sweetapple 505 516
460
Factors Acts limited to mercantile transactions
469
Bills of Lading Amendment Act 1855
476
Rowney 480 487 511
480
Allport
496
Miller
512
The Cheque Bank
513
The Sea Fire Life
537
Cottrell
541
Byers
547
Chartered Mercantile Bank
562
Sharpe
573
Measure of Damages of a Dishonoured Bill
579

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 484 - Where the instrument contains or a person adds to his signature words indicating that he signs for or on behalf of a principal, or in a representative capacity, he is not liable on the instrument if he was duly authorized; but the mere addition of words describing him as an agent, or as filling a representative character, without disclosing his principal, does not exempt him from personal liability.
Page 496 - Partial, that is to say, an acceptance to pay part only of the amount for which the bill is drawn ; 3.
Page 490 - In the hands of any holder other than a holder in due course, a negotiable instrument is subject to the same defenses as if it were non-negotiable. But a holder who derives his title through a holder in due course, and who is not himself a party to any fraud or illegality affecting the instrument, has all the rights of such former holder in respect of all parties prior to the latter.
Page 474 - Where a banker in good faith and without negligence receives payment for a customer of a cheque crossed generally or specially to himself, and the customer has no title, or a defective title, thereto, the banker shall not incur any liability to the true owner of the cheque by reason only of having received such payment.
Page 342 - ... any body politic or corporate whatsoever created or to be created, or for any other persons whatsoever united or to be united in covenants or partnership exceeding the number of six persons in that part of Great Britain called England, to borrow, owe, or take up any sum or sums of money on their bills or notes payable on demand or at any less time than six months from the borrowing thereof...
Page 484 - But if any such instrument, after completion, is negotiated to a holder in due course, it is valid and effectual for all purposes in his hands, and he may enforce it as if it had been filled up strictly in accordance with the authority given and within a reasonable time.
Page 531 - Interest thereon from the time of presentment for payment if the bill is payable on demand, and from the maturity of the bill in any other case : (c.) The expenses of noting, or, when protest is necessary, and the protest has been extended, the expenses of protest.
Page 524 - Notice of dishonor may be waived, either before the time of giving notice has arrived, or after the omission to give due notice, and the waiver may be express or implied.
Page 523 - Where the instrument has been dishonored in the hands of an agent, he may either himself give notice to the parties liable thereon, or he may give notice to his principal. If he give notice to his principal, he must do so within the same time as if he were the holder, and the principal upon the receipt of such notice has himself the same time for giving notice as if the agent had been an independent holder.
Page 433 - Act had not passed), to pass and transfer the legal right to such debt or chose in action from the date of such notice, and all legal and other remedies for the same, and the power to give a good discharge for the same, without the concurrence of the assignor...

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