The Three Musketeers: Alexandre Dumas ; Revised and Updated Translation by Eleanor Hochman ; with an Introduction by Thomas Flanagan ; and a New Afterword by Marcelle Clements

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Penguin, 2006 - Fiction - 636 pages
7 Reviews
A major new translation of one of the most enduring works of literature, from the award- winning, bestselling co-translator of Anna Karenina—with a spectacular, specially illustrated cover

The Three Musketeers is the most famous of Alexandre Dumas's historical novels and one of the most popular adventure stories ever written. Now in a bracing new translation, this swashbuckling epic chronicles the adventures of d'Artagnan, a brash young man from the countryside who journeys to Paris in 1625 hoping to become a musketeer and guard to King Louis XIII. Before long he finds treachery and court intrigue—and also three boon companions: the daring swordsmen Athos, Porthos, and Aramis. Together they strive heroically to defend the honor of their queen against the powerful Cardinal Richelieu and the seductive spy Milady.


@d'ArtsDaMAN It's time to go off into the world and follow my secondary dream and become a Musketeer. Apparently Jedis don't actually exist.

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Painstakingly long, but a very adventurous read. Classic.

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D'Artagnan, a young man of twenty or so, comes to Paris to make his fortune. His father, a poor nobleman, has given him a letter for M. de Treville, the leader of the King's Musketeers. And our journey begins. D'Artagnan meets a mysterious stranger and a lovely woman whom he knows will have some affect on his life. He then meets Athos, Aramis and Porthos (the Three Musketeers) and quickly offends them all. He is to duel with them until they realize that all three have duels with him, at which point it is called off because some of the Cardinal's guards are approaching. They fight and all become close friends afterward. D'Artagnan has a love interest (Madame Bonacieux) who is the wife of his landlord. She is a faithful servant of the queen and D'Artagnan is a soldier in the King's guards. He aids her one night as she attempts to bring Lord Buckingham to meet the queen. Many adventures ensue, many too many to list here. Madame Bonacieux is kidnapped and D'Artagnan falls in with Lady Clarik and her servant, Kitty. Kitty is in love with him and D'Artagnan uses her love to gain revenge on Lady Clarik (milady) by sleeping with her while posing as a man she is trying to seduce. D'Artagnan saves the queen by traveling to England to get back some pearls she gave him, and Lady Clarik later goes to England to assassinate Buckingham, only to become a prisoner. A large portion of the story is her imprisonment and seduction of her guard, a fanatical Puritan. Her mission accomplished, Lady Clarik goes in search of Bonacieux, finds her and poisons her. D'Artagnan and the Musketeers hunt her down (she's also Athos' wife and the reason for his estrangement from his family) and execute her. D'Artagnan becomes a lieutenant in the Musketeers, Athos serves beneath him, Porthos marries a rich widow and Aramis enters the church. Planchet, D'Artagnan's lackey, joins the guards.
A great book that was wrapped up too quickly and too well. Everyone lives happily ever after and it just seems too cutesy. I loved the early parts with D'Artagnan and the Musketeers, the adventure to Buckingham in England, every part with Athos (the best character), the seduction of Felton by Milady, the conversations between the Cardinal and the King, and the dynamic between Kitty and D'Artagnan. Athos seems to become the leader as time progresses in the story, while D'Artagnan is surely the leader to start. The style of the book (two columns per page) really added a lot to the story; I could imagine reading the story weekly in a magazine. This was Dumas' first hit book and his maturity as a writer really showed through in The Count of Monte Cristo. This book, while very well done, pales in comparison to that masterpiece, in my opinion.
 

Contents

The Three Presents of M dArtagnan the Elder I
1
de Trevilles Anteroom
15
The Audience
25
Athos Porthos and Aramis
36
The Kings Musketeers and the Cardinals Guards
43
His Majesty King Louis XIII
54
The Musketeers at Home
72
A Court Intrigue
80
Miladys Secret
367
How Athos Acquired His Equipment
373
Without Any Effort
381
A Vision
382
The Cardinal
390
The Siege of La Rochelle
397
The Anjou Wine
409
The ColombierRouge Inn
417

DArtagnans Merits Become Clear
88
A SeventeenthCentury Mousetrap
95
The Plot Thickens
104
George Villiers Duke of Buckingham
121
Monsieur Bonacieux
129
The Man of Meung
137
Men of the Robe and Men of the Sword
147
Siguier Keeper of the Seals Again Looks for the Bell He Rang in His Youth
155
Monsieur and Madame Bonacieux at Home
166
The Lover and the Husband
178
The Campaign Plan
185
The Journey
193
Lady de Winter
204
The Merlaison Ballet
213
The Rendezvous
220
The Villa
230
Porthos
240
Aramiss Thesis
258
4ioi5 We
273
The Return
291
Hunting for the Equipment
304
Milady
312
Englishmen and Frenchmen
319
Lunch at the Procurators
327
Mfld and Mistress
336
More About Aramiss and Porthoss Equipment
345
All Cats Are Gray in the Dark
353
Dreams of Vengeance
360
The Usefulness of Stovepipes
424
A Conjugal Scene
432
The SaintGervais Bastion
437
The Musketeers Council
444
A Family Affair
459
A Setback
473
A Conversation Between Brother and Sister
480
Officer
487
The First Day of Captivity
497
The Second Day of Captivity
503
The Third Day of Captivity
510
The Fourth Day of Captivity
518
The Fifth Day of Captivity
526
The Climax of the Drama
539
Escape
545
What Happened in Portsmouth on August 23 1628
553
In France
563
The Carmelite Convent at Bethune
568
Two Kinds of Fiend
581
The Drop of Water
586
The Man in the Red Cloak
599
The Trial
604
The Execution
611
Conclusion
616
Epilogue
625
A Note to the Reader
627
Afterword
629
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870) was the author of more than a hundred plays and novels including the famous "Three Musketeers "trilogy (1844-47), " The Count of Monte Cristo "(1844-45), and "The Man in the Iron Mask "(1848-50). His grandfather was a nobleman who lived in the French colony of Santo Domingo (now Haiti), and his grandmother an Afro-Caribbean slave. Dumas's father, a celebrated general in Napoleon's army, eventually fell out of favor and then died when Alexandre was four years old, leaving his family in poverty. At the age of twenty-one, Dumas moved to Paris, where he enjoyed success first as a playwright and then as a prolific writer of both fiction and nonfiction. He took part in the uprising of July 1830, which placed his patron, Louis-Philippe, on the throne, and built his own imposing Chateau de Monte Cristo outside of Paris. But by 1851, his lavish lifestyle had bankrupted him, and he left France, fleeing both creditors and Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte, the new ruler who was no fan of Dumas. In the following decade, he made extended stays in Belgium, Russia, and Italy, where he joined the movement for its independence and unification. He died penniless but optimistic, saying of death, "I shall tell her a story, and she will be kind to me."
A scholar, critic, and novelist, Thomas Flanagan (1923-2002) was the author of "The Irish Novelists, 1800-1850 "(1959), "The Year of the French "(1979), which won the National Book Critics Award, "The Tenants of Time "(1988), and "The End of the Hunt "(1994).
Marcelle Clements is a novelist and journalist who has contributed articles on culture, the arts, and politics to many national publications. She is the author of two books of nonfiction, "The Dog Is Us "and "The Improvised Woman," and the novels" Rock Me "and "Midsummer."

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