The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Oct 18, 2011 - Fiction - 240 pages
23 Reviews

“A psychedelic odyssey of hallucinations-within-hallucinations from which no reader emerges unscathed.”—Boston Globe

On Mars, the harsh climate could make any colonist turn to drugs to escape a dead-end existence. Especially when the drug is Can-D, which translates its users into the idyllic world of a Barbie-esque character named Perky Pat. When the mysterious Palmer Eldritch arrives with a new drug called Chew-Z, he offers a more addictive experience, one that might bring the user closer to God. But in a world where everyone is tripping, no promises can be taken at face value.

This Nebula Award nominee is one of Philip K. Dick’s enduring classics, at once a deep character study, a dark mystery, and a tightrope walk along the edge of reality and illusion.

 

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User Review  - Lukerik - LibraryThing

Perfectly paced world-building, high imagination and themes of drugs and religion. Very clever how the drug induced effects on one character can invade the future reality of other characters. I've had ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AHS-Wolfy - LibraryThing

Barney Mayerson has just received his draft notice to join the Mars colony. He can probably gt out of it if he wants to but he's not entirely sure that he does. Currently employed as one of the top ... Read full review

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Contents

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Back Cover
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About the author (2011)

Over a writing career that spanned three decades, PHILIP K. DICK (1928–1982) published 36 science fiction novels and 121 short stories in which he explored the essence of what makes man human and the dangers of centralized power. Toward the end of his life, his work turned toward deeply personal, metaphysical questions concerning the nature of God. Eleven novels and short stories have been adapted to film, notably Blade Runner (based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), Total Recall,Minority Report, and A Scanner Darkly. The recipient of critical acclaim and numerous awards throughout his career, Dick was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2005, and in 2007 the Library of America published a selection of his novels in three volumes. His work has been translated into more than twenty-five languages.

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