The Thurber Carnival

Front Cover
James Thurber's unique ability to convey the vagaries of life in a funny, witty, and often satirical way earned him accolades as one of the finest humorists of the twentieth century. A bestseller upon its initial publication in 1945. The Thurber Carnival captures the depth and breadth of his talent. The pieces here, almost all of which first appeared in The New Yorker, include selections from such beloved classics as My World and Welcome to It, The Owl in the Attic, The Seal in the Bathroom, and Men, Women and Dogs. Thurber's take on life, society, and human nature is timeless and will continue to delight readers even as they recognize a bit of themselves in his brilliant sketches.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stef7sa - www.librarything.com

Light prose, merely anecdotical or sketchy at points. The best are not the memories but the stories and among these the two about the husband who has left his wife and is living in a hotel. In these ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - unclebob53703 - www.librarything.com

A collection of some of his best stories and cartoons, the best of which are superb. It's another book I thought was only available in paperback, until I found there was this gorgeous leather-bound ... Read full review

Contents

THE LADY ON I42
3
THE CATBIRD SEAT
9
MEMOIRS OF A DRUDGE
18
THE CANE IN THE CORRIDOR
24
THE SECRET LIFE OF JAMES THURBER
30
RECOLLECTIONS OF THE GAS BUGGY
36
From My World and Welcome to
43
DESTRUCTIVE FORCES IN LIFE
73
THE NIGHT THE GHOST GOT IN
196
MORE ALARMS AT NIGHT
202
THE DOG THAT BIT PEOPLE
214
UNIVERSITY DAYS
221
DRAFT BOARD NIGHTS
229
A NOTE AT THE END
239
THE BIRDS AND THE FOXES
245
THE VERY PROPER GANDER
251

SEX EX MACHINA
79
THE BREAKING UP OF THE WINSHIPS
85
A COUPLE OF HAMBURGERS
93
DOC MARLOWE
100
THERES AN OWL IN MY ROOM
116
SNAPSHOT OF A DOG
122
PREFACE TO A UFE
173
THE CAR WE HAD TO PUSH
182
THE DAY THE DAM BROKE
190
THE SEAL WHO BECAME FAMOUS
257
THE GLASS IN THE FIELD
263
EXCELSIOR
270
OH WHEN I WAS
276
Stop Me
325
Seem to Have This Rabbit
343
What Have You Done With Dr Millmoss?
358
Copyright

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About the author (1945)

Born in Columbus, Ohio, Thurber was blinded in one eye in a childhood accident. He attended Ohio State University but left without earning a degree. In 1925 he moved to New York City, where he joined the staff of the New Yorker in 1927 at the urging of his friend E. B. White. For the rest of his lifetime, Thurber contributed to the magazine his highly individual pieces and those strange, wry, and disturbing pen-and-ink drawings of "huge, resigned dogs, the determined and sometimes frightening women, the globular men who try so hard to think so unsuccessfully." The period from 1925, when the New Yorker was founded, until the death of its creator-editor, Harold Ross, in 1951, was described by Thurber in delicious and absorbing detail in The Years with Ross (1959). Of his two great talents, Thurber preferred to think of himself primarily as a writer, illustrating his own books. He published "fables" in the style of Aesop (see Vol. 2) and La Fontaine (see Vol. 2)---usually with a "barbed tip of contemporary significance"---children's books, several plays (two Broadway hits, one successful musical revue), and endless satires and parodies in short stories or full-length works. "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," included in My World---and Welcome to It (1942), is probably his best-known story and continues to be frequently anthologized. T. S. Eliot described Thurber's work as "a form of humor which is also a way of saying something serious.

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