The Time Garden

Front Cover
HarperCollins, Mar 31, 1999 - Juvenile Fiction - 224 pages
5 Reviews
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Time and again, the children from Knight's Castle have longed for another magic adventure. But you can't find magic just anywhere. It doesn't just grow like grass. It requires the right place and the right time—
     Or thyme, as the case may be.
     For at Mrs. Whiton's house, magic grows wild as the fragrant banks of thyme in her garden. Eliza insists that time doesn't grow, it flies—yet growing in the garden is olden time, future time, and common time. Or so says the Natterjack, the odd toadlike creature who presides over the garden and accompanies the kids on a series of perilous, hilarious, always unpredictable adventures. "Anything can happen," the Natterjack says with a wink, "when you have all the time in the world."

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - PollyMoore3 - LibraryThing

I remember enjoying Eager's books borrowed from the library when I was small: this one, and "Half Magic". ("Magic by the Lake" was a bit contrived though). He admired E Nesbit's magical stories and ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kaitanya64 - LibraryThing

Four cousins find a garden that allows them to travel magically through time (by sniffing thyme). As in all of Eager's books, however, magic is unpredictable and often uncontrollable. This is a great ... Read full review

Contents

1 All the Time in the World
1
2 Wild Time
23
3 Time Will Tell
49
4 All in Good Time
81
5 Common Time
113
6 Time Out of Mind
135
7 The Last Time?
160
8 The Time Is Ripe
185
Back Matter
203
Inside Back Cover
205
Back Cover
206
Spine
207
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Edward Eager (1911–1964) worked primarily as a playwright and lyricist. It wasn’t until 1951, while searching for books to read to his young son, Fritz, that he began writing children’s stories. His classic Tales of Magic series started with the best-selling Half Magic, published in 1954. In each of his books he carefully acknowledges his indebtedness to E. Nesbit, whom he considered the best children’s writer of all time—“so that any child who likes my books and doesn’t know hers may be led back to the master of us all.”

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