The Torrents of Spring: And First Love

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The Floating Press, Aug 1, 2011 - Fiction - 314 pages
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Get acquainted with the work of Russian literary master Ivan Turgenev in this rich, multifaceted tale of unrequited romantic love and self-discovery. The Torrents of Spring follows the coming-of-age of a young Russian aristocrat who is willing to give away everything he owns to pursue love. But before he can achieve his happily-ever-after, a sophisticated seductress steps in and induces him to stray from his single-minded goal. Will the young protagonist make the right decision? Read The Torrents of Spring to find out.
 

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Contents

The Torrents of Spring
6
I
9
II
11
III
14
IV
18
V
20
VI
23
VII
26
XXXVI
155
XXXVII
162
XXXVIII
165
XXXIX
171
XL
180
XLI
185
XLII
189
XLIII
197

VIII
30
IX
32
X
34
XI
38
XII
41
XIII
43
XIV
45
XV
48
XVI
51
XVII
57
XVIII
62
XIX
66
XX
70
XXI
73
XXII
78
XXIII
86
XXIV
91
XXV
98
XXVI
103
XXVII
107
XXVIII
112
XXIX
117
XXX
120
XXXI
126
XXXII
134
XXXIII
138
XXXIV
143
XXXV
148
XLIV
200
First Love
205
I
207
II
210
III
212
IV
214
V
223
VI
226
VII
229
VIII
236
IX
240
X
247
XI
251
XII
255
XIII
258
XIV
261
XV
263
XVI
267
XVII
274
XVIII
279
XIX
282
XX
284
XXI
288
XXII
293
Mumu
297
Endnotes
333
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Ivan Turgenev, 1818 - 1883 Novelist, poet and playwright, Ivan Turgenev, was born to a wealthy family in Oryol in the Ukraine region of Russia. He attended St. Petersburg University (1834-37) and Berlin University (1838-41), completing his master's exam at St. Petersburg. His career at the Russian Civil Service began in 1841. He worded for the Ministry of Interior from 1843-1845. In the 1840's, Turgenev began writing poetry, criticism, and short stories under Nikolay Gogol's influence. "A Sportsman's Sketches" (1852) were short pieces written from the point of view of a nobleman who learns to appreciate the wisdom of the peasants who live on his family's estate. This brought him a month of detention and eighteen months of house arrest. From 1853-62, he wrote stories and novellas, which include the titles "Rudin" (1856), "Dvorianskoe Gnedo" (1859), "Nakanune" (1860) and "Ottsy I Deti" (1862). Turgenev left Russia, in 1856, because of the hostile reaction to his work titled "Fathers and Sons" (1862). Turgenev finally settled in Paris. He became a corresponding member of the Imperial Academy of Sciences in 1860 and Doctor of Civil Law at Oxford University in 1879. His last published work, "Poems in Prose," was a collection of meditations and anecdotes. On September 3, 1883, Turgenev died in Bougival, near Paris.

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