The Trade Relations of the British Empire

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Dec 16, 2010 - Business & Economics - 450 pages
0 Reviews
The growth of an 'imperial' outlook in colonial policy at the end of the nineteenth century led to calls for greater imperial integration, which prompted studies and scholarly works on the economic relations between Britain and its imperial possessions. This volume, first published in 1903 and written by the economist John William Root, explores both the internal and external trade relations in the British Empire and its constituent colonies. Focusing on the practical aspects of international trade, Root discusses the customs policies and tariffs, main imports and exports and external influences on trade of the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Australia, the West Indies and Canada. Organised by geographical region, the book also discusses fiscal warfare and the effect of preferential trade tariffs, using Canada as an example. This volume provides a detailed analysis of the system of trade regulations and their impact on imperial trade in the early twentieth century.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

CHAPTER I
1
CHAPTER II
23
The Drift of Australasian TradeInfluence of the Suez Canal
63
CHAPTER IV
101
The Foreign Trade op India
153
CHAPTER VI
200
Miscellaneous Possessions and Protectorates
251
CHAPTER VIII
269
CHAPTER IX
312
CHAPTER X
359
Total Oversea Imports and Exports of Principal British
418
Index
425
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information