The Translatability of Cultures: Figurations of the Space Between

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Stanford University Press, 1996 - Social Science - 348 pages
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Translation between any two languages sets in motion a cultural tug-of-war. This struggle can be perilous for the culture that has less power to retain the usages of its language. Since translation wields powerful forces of cultural change, it is an arena both of the global coercions of national cultures and of the local dominations of everyday others by everyday selves. Thus the ethics of translation are both the ethics of cross-cultural discourse and the unit problem of ethical discourse itself. The 14 essays in this volume consider a wide variety of cultures from ancient Egypt to contemporary Japan. The essays describe the conditions under which cultures that do not dominate each other may yet achieve a limited translatability of cultures, while at the same time alerting us to some of the dangers of a so-called mutual translation between cultures.
 

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Contents

Religion as a Factor of Cultural
25
A Case Study
37
From Vertical to Horizontal
55
Augustine Chaucer and the Translation of Biblical Poetics
68
The Curse and Blessing of Babel or Looking Back
85
Reading Fate
105
The Holocaust and the Construction of Modern American
127
A CrossCultural Perspective
147
Ruth
207
CrossCulture Chiasmus and the Manifold of Mind
224
Thomas Carlyles
245
Memory and Cultural Translation
265
Remarks on the Foreign Strange as a Figure of Cultural
282
Coda to the Discussion
294
Notes
305
Index
345

The BuberRosenzweig Bible Translation
169
Japan Radical Otherness and
186

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