The Triangle of Representation

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Columbia University Press, Aug 14, 2012 - Literary Criticism - 123 pages
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Moving deftly among literary and visual arts, as well as the modern critical canon, Christopher Prendergast's book explores the meaning and value of representation as both a philosophical challenge (What does it mean to create an image that "stands for" something absent?) and a political issue (Who has the right to represent whom?).

The Triangle of Representation raises a range of theoretical, historical, and aesthetic questions, and offers subtle readings of such cultural critics as Raymond Williams, Paul de Man, Edward Said, Walter Benjamin, and Hélène Cixous, in addition to penetrating investigations of visual artists like Gros, Ingres, and Matisse and significant insights into Proust and the onus of translating him. Above all, Prendergast's work is a striking display of how a firm grounding in theory is essential for the exploration of art and literature.
 

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Contents

Prendergast CH 01pdf
1
Prendergast CH 02pdf
17
Prendergast CH 03pdf
31
Prendergast CH 04pdf
47
Prendergast CH 05pdf
63
Prendergast CH 06pdf
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Prendergast CH 07pdf
101
Prendergast CH 08pdf
117
Prendergast CH 09pdf
133
Prendergast CH 10pdf
147
Prendergast CH 11pdf
161
Prendergast Notespdf
177
Prendergast Indexpdf
191
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About the author (2012)

Christopher Prendergast is professor of French literature at Cambridge University and a fellow of the British Academy. His six previous books include The Order of Mimesis and Writing the City: Paris and the Nineteenth Century.


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