The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs

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Puffin Books, 1996 - Juvenile Fiction - 32 pages
21 Reviews
You thought you knew the story of the “The Three Little Pigs”… You thought wrong.
 
In this hysterical and clever fracture fairy tale picture book that twists point of view and perspective, young readers will finally hear the other side of the story of “The Three Little Pigs.”
 
“In this humorous story, Alexander T. Wolf tells his own outlandish version of what really happens during his encounter with the three pigs…. Smith's simplistic and wacky illustrations add to the effectiveness of this fractured fairy tale.”
—Children’s Literature
 
“Older kids (and adults) will find very funny.”
—School Library Journal

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hilarious

User Review  - mom101 - Target

My 5 year old read almost a year ago, and has been asking to read again ever since. We purchased for Christmas and laugh hysterically each time we read. It has already become one of our memorable favorites. Read full review

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i do not like this book fyi it says in the last paragraph that the author stinks

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About the author (1996)

Multiple award-winning author Jon Scieszka grew up in Flint, Michigan, the second oldest and the nicest of six boys. Jon went to school at Culver Military Academy in Indiana where he was a Lieutenant; Albion College in Michigan where he studied to be a doctor; and Columbia University in New York, where he received an M.F.A. in fiction. He taught elementary school in New York for ten years in a variety of positions. He is the author of many boks for children including the New York Times Best Illustrated Book The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales (illustrated by Lane Smith), the Caldecott Honor book The True Story of the Three Little Pigs (illustrated by Lane Smith), and Math Curse (illustrated by Lane Smith).  In addition to his work as an author, Jon also runs a web-based literacy program called “Guys Read” that is designed to encourage boys, particularly reluctant readers, to get involved with books. In 2008, Jon was named the country’s first National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, a joint effort of the Library of Congress and the Children’s Book Council. During his two-year role as Ambassador, he acted as a spokesperson for children’s literature, speaking to groups of parents, teachers, and children to encourage the importance of reading. You can visit Jon online at www. jsworldwide.com.
 
Lane Smith’s illustrations have appeared in many publications including, The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times Magazine, The Boston Globe, Sierra, American Bookseller, The Progressive, Time, Newsweek, Mother Jones, and Ms. He is the illustrator of James and the Giant Peach (by Roald Dahl), the New York Times Best Illustrated Book The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales (by Jon Scieszka), and the Caldecott Honor book The True Story of the Three Little Pigs (by Jon Scieszka). He is also the author/illustrator of It’s a Book, John, Paul, George & Ben, and Grandpa Green. You can visit him online at www. lanesmithbooks.com.

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