The Turquoise Lament: A Travis McGee Novel

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Random House Publishing Group, Jan 8, 2013 - Fiction - 304 pages
1 Review
"One of the most enduring and unusual heroes in detective fiction."

THE BALTIMORE SUN

Now that Linda "Pidge" Lewellen is grown up, she tells Travis McGee, once her girlhood idol, that either she's going crazy or Howie, her affable ex-jock of a husband is trying to kill her. McGee checks things out, and gives Pidge the all clear. But when Pidge and Howie sail away to kiss and make up, McGee has second thoughts. If only he can get to Pidge before he has time for any more thinking....
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ABVR - LibraryThing

John D. MacDonald’s tales of freelance “salvage expert” Travis McGee are, at heart, formulaic tough-guy adventure stories. The series ultimately transcends the formula in which it’s rooted—Travis ... Read full review

TURQUOISE LAMENT

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

The most notable thing here is that this is the first time MacDonald has appeared initially in hardcover, although as he idles along, you might wonder what happened to what's happening since MacDonald ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
16
Section 3
35
Section 4
53
Section 5
72
Section 6
80
Section 7
93
Section 8
105
Section 12
165
Section 13
173
Section 14
188
Section 15
206
Section 16
230
Section 17
241
Section 18
258
Section 19
268

Section 9
117
Section 10
133
Section 11
153
Section 20
273
Section 21
285
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

John D. MacDonald was an American novelist and short-story writer. His works include the Travis McGee series and the novel The Executioners, which was adapted into the film Cape Fear. In 1962 MacDonald was named a Grand Master of the Mystery Writers of America; in 1980, he won a National Book Award. In print he delighted in smashing the bad guys, deflating the pompous, and exposing the venal. In life, he was a truly empathetic man; his friends, family, and colleagues found him to be loyal, generous, and practical. In business, he was fastidiously ethical. About being a writer, he once expressed with gleeful astonishment, “They pay me to do this! They don’t realize, I would pay them.” He spent the later part of his life in Florida with his wife and son. He died in 1986.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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