The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath, 1950-1962

Front Cover
Anchor Books, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 732 pages
Published in Their Entirety for the First Time, Sylvaia Plath's journals provide an intimate portrait of the writer who was to produce in the last seven months of her life some of the most extraordinary poems of the twentieth century. Faithfully transcribed from the twenty-three journals and journal fragments owned by Smith College, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath includes two journals that Plath's husband, Ted Hughes, unsealed just before his death in 1998. A heavily abridged edition of Plath's diaries was published in 1982. Roughly two-thirds of this new unabridged edition is material that has never before been made public, revealing more fully the intensity of the poet's personal and literary struggles, and providing fresh insight into both her frequent desperation and the bravery with which she faced her demons. With its haunting, vibrant, and brutally honest prose, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath is essential reading for all who have been moved and fascinated by Plath's life and work.

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User Review  - amerynth - LibraryThing

Like many girls of my day, I was obsessed with Sylvia Plath back in my high school years-- I read everything I could get my hands on by her, as well as the Ted Hughes edit of her journals (in which ... Read full review

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User Review  - viviennestrauss - LibraryThing

At times I felt as if I would never finish though it only took approximately two weeks for me to read. It sat on my nightstand for nearly a year before I actually felt ready to tackle it. Lots of ... Read full review

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About the author (2000)

Sylvia Plath was born in 1932 in Massachusetts. She began publishing poems and stories at a young age and by the time she entered Smith College had won several poetry prizes. She was a Fulbright Scholar in Cambridge, England, and married British poet Ted Hughes in London in 1956. The young couple moved to the States, where Plath became an instructor at Smith College. Later, they moved back to England, where Plath continued writing poetry and wrote her novel, The Bell Jar, which was first published under the pseudonym Victoria Lucas in England in 1963. On February 11, 1963, Plath committed suicide. Her Collected Poems, published posthumously in 1981, won the Pulitzer Prize.

Karen V. Kukil is Associate Curator of Rare Books at Smith College, with particular responsibility for superervising scholarly use of the Sylvia Plath Collection.

Bibliographic information