The Uncensored War: The Media and Vietnam

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University of California Press, 1989 - History - 285 pages
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This book was finished in the tenth year after the end of the Vietnam War. The year 1985 was also the year of Rambo, and of a number of other celebration of the Vietnam War in popular culture. It was the year Congress cut off aid to the "Contras" in Nicaragua, and then abruptly reversed itself and approved "humanitarian" aid to support the guerrilla war in that country. The "Vietnam Syndrome" showed signs of giving way tot he "Grenada Syndrome": the fear of repeating the Vietnam experience showed signs of giving way to a desire to relive it in an idealized form. The nation seemed deeply confused about its identity as an actor in world politics, and thus particularly vulnerable to appealing myths. So it is a good time to take a sober look back and the nation's consciousness during the Vietnam War itself--which as we shall see, despite the popular image of an independent media demolishing the nation's illusions, was also governed by a powerful mythology, born in part out of the traumas of earlier wars.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Escalation and News Management 19611965
13
A Legitimate Part of that Global Commitment
26
It Does Not Imply Any Change of Policy Whatever
59
The War on Television 19651973
103
The Uncensored War 19651967
114
We Are on Our Way Out 19681973 759
159
Conclusion 277
211
BIBLIOGRAPHY
243
Abbreviations
253
INDEX
275
Copyright

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About the author (1989)

Daniel C. Hallin is Professor of Communications and Adjunct Professor of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego.

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